FINE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - fine in Hard Times
1  It was a fine night: not moonlight, but sultry and fragrant.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  They liked fine gentlemen; they pretended that they did not, but they did.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
3  He was as much amused and interested, at present, as it became so fine a gentleman to be; perhaps even more than it would have been consistent with his reputation to confess.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
4  It was a fine sight, to behold the learned dog barking round it, and Mr. Sleary instructing him, with his one practicable eye, that Bitzer was the object of his particular attentions.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
5  The night being fine, little knots of Hands were here and there lingering at street corners; but it was supper-time with the greater part of them, and there were but few people in the streets.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
6  But from this day, the Sparsit action upon Mr. Bounderby threw Louisa and James Harthouse more together, and strengthened the dangerous alienation from her husband and confidence against him with another, into which she had fallen by degrees so fine that she could not retrace them if she tried.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
7  These attributes of Coketown were in the main inseparable from the work by which it was sustained; against them were to be set off, comforts of life which found their way all over the world, and elegancies of life which made, we will not ask how much of the fine lady, who could scarcely bear to hear the place mentioned.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V