FIRE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - fire in Hard Times
1  She returned the kiss, but still looked at the fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
2  And he sat rocking himself over the fire, as if he was in pain.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
3  Saving that the fire had died out, it was as his eyes had closed upon it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
4  Coketown did not come out of its own furnaces, in all respects like gold that had stood the fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  Everything was in its place and order as he had always kept it, the little fire was newly trimmed, and the hearth was freshly swept.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
6  Louisa languidly leaned upon the window looking out, without looking at anything, while young Thomas stood sniffing revengefully at the fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
7  Young Thomas expressed these sentiments sitting astride of a chair before the fire, with his arms on the back, and his sulky face on his arms.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VIII
8  Mr. Bounderby was obliged to get up from table, and stand with his back to the fire, looking at her; she was such an enhancement of his position.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
9  Her father might instinctively have loosened his hold, but that he felt her strength departing from her, and saw a wild dilating fire in the eyes steadfastly regarding him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
10  A dull anger that she should be seen in her distress, and that the involuntary look she had so resented should come to this fulfilment, smouldered within her like an unwholesome fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
11  First to wake them, and next to tell them, all so wild and breathless as she was, what had brought her there, were difficulties; but they no sooner understood her than their spirits were on fire like hers.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
12  In the formal drawing-room of Stone Lodge, standing on the hearthrug, warming himself before the fire, Mr. Bounderby delivered some observations to Mrs. Gradgrind on the circumstance of its being his birthday.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
13  The answer was so long in coming, though there was no indecision in it, that Tom went and leaned on the back of her chair, to contemplate the fire which so engrossed her, from her point of view, and see what he could make of it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VIII
14  It seemed as if, first in her own fire within the house, and then in the fiery haze without, she tried to discover what kind of woof Old Time, that greatest and longest-established Spinner of all, would weave from the threads he had already spun into a woman.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
15  He stood before the fire, partly because it was a cool spring afternoon, though the sun shone; partly because the shade of Stone Lodge was always haunted by the ghost of damp mortar; partly because he thus took up a commanding position, from which to subdue Mrs. Gradgrind.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
16  But, when he is trimmed, smoothed, and varnished, according to the mode; when he is aweary of vice, and aweary of virtue, used up as to brimstone, and used up as to bliss; then, whether he take to the serving out of red tape, or to the kindling of red fire, he is the very Devil.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
17  There was an air of jaded sullenness in them both, and particularly in the girl: yet, struggling through the dissatisfaction of her face, there was a light with nothing to rest upon, a fire with nothing to burn, a starved imagination keeping life in itself somehow, which brightened its expression.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
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