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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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1  He thinks he breathes it first; but not so.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
2  And at first, this sort of thing is unpleasant enough.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
3  They had just landed from their boat, and this was the first house they entered.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
4  Returning from my first morning stroll, I again sallied out upon this special errand.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. The Chapel.
5  From thence it is the God of breezes fair or foul is first invoked for favourable winds.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
6  At first I knew not what to make of this; but soon an inkling of the truth occurred to me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
7  From thence it is the storm of God's quick wrath is first descried, and the bow must bear the earliest brunt.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
8  Remembering the embalmed head, at first I almost thought that this black manikin was a real baby preserved in some similar manner.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
9  At my first glimpse of the pulpit, it had not escaped me that however convenient for a ship, these joints in the present instance seemed unnecessary.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
10  I then placed the first bench lengthwise along the only clear space against the wall, leaving a little interval between, for my back to settle down in.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
11  It had a careless look, as if it were meant for the uses of the public; so, entering, the first thing I did was to stumble over an ash-box in the porch.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
12  So saying he procured the plane; and with his old silk handkerchief first dusting the bench, vigorously set to planing away at my bed, the while grinning like an ape.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
13  Such unaccountable masses of shades and shadows, that at first you almost thought some ambitious young artist, in the time of the New England hags, had endeavored to delineate chaos bewitched.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  Indeed, partly lying on it as the arm did when I first awoke, I could hardly tell it from the quilt, they so blended their hues together; and it was only by the sense of weight and pressure that I could tell that Queequeg was hugging me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
15  No one having previously heard his history, could for the first time behold Father Mapple without the utmost interest, because there were certain engrafted clerical peculiarities about him, imputable to that adventurous maritime life he had led.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
16  If I had been astonished at first catching a glimpse of so outlandish an individual as Queequeg circulating among the polite society of a civilized town, that astonishment soon departed upon taking my first daylight stroll through the streets of New Bedford.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. The Street.
17  When, at last, his mind seemed made up touching the character of his bedfellow, and he became, as it were, reconciled to the fact; he jumped out upon the floor, and by certain signs and sounds gave me to understand that, if it pleased me, he would dress first and then leave me to dress afterwards, leaving the whole apartment to myself.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
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