FLOWER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - flower in David Copperfield
1  Then Dora held my flowers to Jip to smell.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
2  The south wind blew Dora, and the wild flowers in the hedges were all Doras, to a bud.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
3  I am imperfectly consoled for this disappointment by the sacred pledge, the perished flower.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. A RETROSPECT
4  It was a prettily furnished room, with a piano and some lively furniture in red and green, and some flowers.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. I MAKE ANOTHER BEGINNING
5  Of my darling being almost smothered among the flowers, and coming out, laughing and crying both together, to my jealous arms.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
6  I take off my ring, I wear my worst clothes, I use no bear's grease, and I frequently lament over the late Miss Larkins's faded flower.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. A RETROSPECT
7  To see her lay the flowers against her little dimpled chin, was to lose all presence of mind and power of language in a feeble ecstasy.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
8  Of their all closing about Dora, when at last she begins to say good-bye, looking, with their bright colours and ribbons, like a bed of flowers.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
9  When the Doctor and I were engaged, he now fell into the custom of walking up and down with Mrs. Strong, and helping her to trim her favourite flowers, or weed the beds.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
10  As I followed the chief waiter with my eyes, I could not help thinking that the garden in which he had gradually blown to be the flower he was, was an arduous place to rise in.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 59. RETURN
11  On the contrary, I seem to have walked along a path of flowers as far as the crocodile-book, and to have been cheered by the gentleness of my mother's voice and manner all the way.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
12  Being, by that time, rather tired of this kind of life, and having received new provocation from the butcher, I throw the flower away, go out with the butcher, and gloriously defeat him.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. A RETROSPECT
13  She was a little, sharp-eyed woman, who used to wear, when she was dressed, one unchangeable cap, ornamented with some artificial flowers, and two artificial butterflies supposed to be hovering above the flowers.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
14  I followed the young woman, and we soon came to a very neat little cottage with cheerful bow-windows: in front of it, a small square gravelled court or garden full of flowers, carefully tended, and smelling deliciously.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
15  There was a charming lawn, there were clusters of trees, and there were perspective walks that I could just distinguish in the dark, arched over with trellis-work, on which shrubs and flowers grew in the growing season.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
16  We loitered along in front of them, and Dora often stopped to admire this one or that one, and I stopped to admire the same one, and Dora, laughing, held the dog up childishly, to smell the flowers; and if we were not all three in Fairyland, certainly I was.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
17  I got some breakfast on the Heath, and walked back to Doctors' Commons, along the watered roads and through a pleasant smell of summer flowers, growing in gardens and carried into town on hucksters' heads, intent on this first effort to meet our altered circumstances.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION
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