FORTUNE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - fortune in Great Expectations
1  I was a poor boy then, as you know, and to a poor boy they were a little fortune.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
2  "I have come into such good fortune since I saw you last, Miss Havisham," I murmured.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
3  I thought what a blessed fortune it was, that he had found another name for me than Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
4  "Since your change of fortune and prospects, you have changed your companions," said Estella.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
5  What alone was wanting to the realization of a vast fortune, he considered to be More Capital.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
6  It is not a fortunate discovery, and is not likely ever to enrich me in reputation, station, fortune, anything.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
7  It is not a fortunate discovery, and is not likely ever to enrich me in reputation, station, fortune, anything.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
8  My dream was out; my wild fancy was surpassed by sober reality; Miss Havisham was going to make my fortune on a grand scale.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
9  We had not yet made any allusion to my change of fortune, nor did I know how much of my late history he was acquainted with.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
10  Yet, having already made his fortune in his own mind, he was so unassuming with it that I felt quite grateful to him for not being puffed up.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
11  My dear friend," said Mr. Pumblechook, taking me by both hands, when he and I and the collation were alone, "I give you joy of your good fortune.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
12  Dissatisfied with my fortune, of course I could not be; but it is possible that I may have been, without quite knowing it, dissatisfied with myself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
13  Again, not a very difficult condition with which to encumber such a rise in fortune; but if you have any objection to it, this is the time to mention it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
14  Scattered wits take a long time picking up; and often before I had got them well together, they would be dispersed in all directions by one stray thought, that perhaps after all Miss Havisham was going to make my fortune when my time was out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
15  There being to my knowledge a respectable lodging-house in Essex Street, the back of which looked into the Temple, and was almost within hail of my windows, I first of all repaired to that house, and was so fortunate as to secure the second floor for my uncle, Mr. Provis.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
16  In these dialogues, my sister spoke to me as if she were morally wrenching one of my teeth out at every reference; while Pumblechook himself, self-constituted my patron, would sit supervising me with a depreciatory eye, like the architect of my fortunes who thought himself engaged on a very unremunerative job.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
17  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
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