FREEDOM in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - freedom in The Souls of Black Folk
1  They welcomed freedom with a cry.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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2  The soul, long pent up and dwarfed, suddenly expands in new-found freedom.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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3  The Nation has not yet found peace from its sins; the freedman has not yet found in freedom his promised land.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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4  After the war this system was attractive to the freedmen on account of its larger freedom and its possibility for making a surplus.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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5  Through fugitive slaves and irrepressible discussion this desire for freedom seized the black millions still in bondage, and became their one ideal of life.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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6  The sole advantage of this small class is their freedom to choose their crops, and the increased responsibility which comes through having money transactions.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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7  Just as centuries ago it was no easy thing for the serf to escape into the freedom of town-life, even so to-day there are hindrances laid in the way of county laborers.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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8  And after the first flush of freedom wore off, and his true helplessness dawned on the freedman, he came back and picked up his hoe, and old master still doled out his bacon and meal.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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9  One can easily see how a person who saw slavery thus from his father's parlors, and sees freedom on the streets of a great city, fails to grasp or comprehend the whole of the new picture.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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10  The ballot, which before he had looked upon as a visible sign of freedom, he now regarded as the chief means of gaining and perfecting the liberty with which war had partially endowed him.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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11  To be sure, ultimate freedom and assimilation was the ideal before the leaders, but the assertion of the manhood rights of the Negro by himself was the main reliance, and John Brown's raid was the extreme of its logic.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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12  So here we stand among thoughts of human unity, even through conquest and slavery; the inferiority of black men, even if forced by fraud; a shriek in the night for the freedom of men who themselves are not yet sure of their right to demand it.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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13  The holocaust of war, the terrors of the Ku-Klux Klan, the lies of carpet-baggers, the disorganization of industry, and the contradictory advice of friends and foes, left the bewildered serf with no new watchword beyond the old cry for freedom.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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14  In the midst, then, of the larger problem of Negro education sprang up the more practical question of work, the inevitable economic quandary that faces a people in the transition from slavery to freedom, and especially those who make that change amid hate and prejudice, lawlessness and ruthless competition.
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15  From the very circumstances of its beginning, the church was confined to the plantation, and consisted primarily of a series of disconnected units; although, later on, some freedom of movement was allowed, still this geographical limitation was always important and was one cause of the spread of the decentralized and democratic Baptist faith among the slaves.
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16  Not a single Southern legislature stood ready to admit a Negro, under any conditions, to the polls; not a single Southern legislature believed free Negro labor was possible without a system of restrictions that took all its freedom away; there was scarcely a white man in the South who did not honestly regard Emancipation as a crime, and its practical nullification as a duty.
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