FRIEND in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - friend in The Importance of Being Earnest
1  with your invalid friend who has the absurd name.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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2  The absence of old friends one can endure with equanimity.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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3  Cecily and Gwendolen are perfectly certain to be extremely great friends.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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4  If you don't take care, your friend Bunbury will get you into a serious scrape some day.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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5  Ernest has just been telling me about his poor invalid friend Mr. Bunbury whom he goes to visit so often.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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6  The moment Algernon first mentioned to me that he had a friend called Ernest, I knew I was destined to love you.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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7  Well, the only small satisfaction I have in the whole of this wretched business is that your friend Bunbury is quite exploded.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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8  It is a great bore, and, I need hardly say, a terrible disappointment to me, but the fact is I have just had a telegram to say that my poor friend Bunbury is very ill again.
The Importance of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde
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