GALE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - gale in Moby Dick
1  In a strait-jacket, he swung to the mad rockings of the gales.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
2  It was during a prolonged gale, in waters hard upon the Antarctic seas.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. The Whiteness of The Whale.
3  For during the violence of the gale, he had only steered according to its vicissitudes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 123. The Musket.
4  I feel strained, half stranded, as ropes that tow dismasted frigates in a gale; and I may look so.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 134. The Chase—Second Day.
5  The gale that now hammers at us to stave us, we can turn it into a fair wind that will drive us towards home.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
6  For some days we had very little wind; it was not till the nineteenth that a brisk gale from the northwest sprang up.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit.
7  But all in vain; the indignant gale howls louder; then, with one hand raised invokingly to God, with the other they not unreluctantly lay hold of Jonah.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
8  In tempestuous times like these, after everything above and aloft has been secured, nothing more can be done but passively to await the issue of the gale.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
9  In a severe gale like this, while the ship is but a tossed shuttlecock to the blast, it is by no means uncommon to see the needles in the compasses, at intervals, go round and round.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 123. The Musket.
10  But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship's direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23. The Lee Shore.
11  In shape, the Sleet's crow's-nest is something like a large tierce or pipe; it is open above, however, where it is furnished with a movable side-screen to keep to windward of your head in a hard gale.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
12  In a word, it was Queequeg's conceit, that if a man made up his mind to live, mere sickness could not kill him: nothing but a whale, or a gale, or some violent, ungovernable, unintelligent destroyer of that sort.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 110. Queequeg in His Coffin.
13  And now behold Jonah taken up as an anchor and dropped into the sea; when instantly an oily calmness floats out from the east, and the sea is still, as Jonah carries down the gale with him, leaving smooth water behind.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
14  Chief among these latter was a great Sperm Whale, which, after an unusually long raging gale, had been found dead and stranded, with his head against a cocoa-nut tree, whose plumage-like, tufted droopings seemed his verdant jet.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 102. A Bower in the Arsacides.
15  Now, gentlemen, sweeping a ship's deck at sea is a piece of household work which in all times but raging gales is regularly attended to every evening; it has been known to be done in the case of ships actually foundering at the time.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
16  Of modern standers-of-mast-heads we have but a lifeless set; mere stone, iron, and bronze men; who, though well capable of facing out a stiff gale, are still entirely incompetent to the business of singing out upon discovering any strange sight.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.