GATE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - gate in Wuthering Heights
1  The apparition had outstripped me: it stood looking through the gate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
2  At that moment the garden gate swung to; the ramblers were returning.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
3  One time I passed the old gate, going out of my way, on a journey to Gimmerton.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
4  In a while, I distinguished steps coming up the road, and the light of a lantern glimmered through the gate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
5  Having uttered these words he left the house, slowly sauntered down the garden path, and disappeared through the gate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
6  I put the orange in his hand, and bade him tell his father that a woman called Nelly Dean was waiting to speak with him, by the garden gate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
7  Then he took the two horses, and led them into the stables; reappearing for the purpose of locking the outer gate, as if we lived in an ancient castle.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
8  Mr. Linton was not far behind; he opened the gate himself and sauntered slowly up, probably enjoying the lovely afternoon that breathed as soft as summer.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
9  I did not fear her breaking bounds; because the gates were generally locked, and I thought she would scarcely venture forth alone, if they had stood wide open.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
10  The front door stood open, but the jealous gate was fastened, as at my last visit; I knocked and invoked Earnshaw from among the garden-beds; he unchained it, and I entered.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
11  I spared a minute to open the gate for it, but instead of going to the house door, it coursed up and down snuffing the grass, and would have escaped to the road, had I not seized it and conveyed it in with me.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
12  Mrs. Earnshaw expected him by supper-time on the third evening, and she put the meal off hour after hour; there were no signs of his coming, however, and at last the children got tired of running down to the gate to look.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  The distance from the gate to the grange is two miles; I believe I managed to make it four, what with losing myself among the trees, and sinking up to the neck in snow: a predicament which only those who have experienced it can appreciate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
14  I was comfortably revelling in the spring fragrance around, and the beautiful soft blue overhead, when my young lady, who had run down near the gate to procure some primrose roots for a border, returned only half laden, and informed us that Mr. Heathcliff was coming in.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
15  I could not wring from my little lady how she had spent the day; except that, as I supposed, the goal of her pilgrimage was Penistone Crags; and she arrived without adventure to the gate of the farm-house, when Hareton happened to issue forth, attended by some canine followers, who attacked her train.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
16  She kept wandering to and fro, from the gate to the door, in a state of agitation which permitted no repose; and at length took up a permanent situation on one side of the wall, near the road: where, heedless of my expostulations and the growling thunder, and the great drops that began to plash around her, she remained, calling at intervals, and then listening, and then crying outright.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX