GIGANTIC in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - gigantic in Moby Dick
1  Out of the bottomless profundities the gigantic tail seems spasmodically snatching at the highest heaven.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 86. The Tail.
2  We were thus placed in the most imminent danger, as this gigantic creature, setting up its back, raised the ship three feet at least out of the water.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit.
3  Relieved against the ghostly light, the gigantic jet negro, Daggoo, loomed up to thrice his real stature, and seemed the black cloud from which the thunder had come.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
4  It is sometimes the custom when fast to a whale more than commonly powerful and alert, to seek to hamstring him, as it were, by sundering or maiming his gigantic tail-tendon.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
5  So, it being calm weather, they broke out deeper and deeper, disturbing the slumbers of the huge ground-tier butts; and from that black midnight sending those gigantic moles into the daylight above.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 110. Queequeg in His Coffin.
6  And as for my exact knowledge of the bones of the leviathan in their gigantic, full grown development, for that rare knowledge I am indebted to my late royal friend Tranquo, king of Tranque, one of the Arsacides.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 102. A Bower in the Arsacides.
7  But the sight of little Flask mounted upon gigantic Daggoo was yet more curious; for sustaining himself with a cool, indifferent, easy, unthought of, barbaric majesty, the noble negro to every roll of the sea harmoniously rolled his fine form.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
8  All the yard-arms were tipped with a pallid fire; and touched at each tri-pointed lightning-rod-end with three tapering white flames, each of the three tall masts was silently burning in that sulphurous air, like three gigantic wax tapers before an altar.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
9  Not to tell over again his furlongs from spiracle to tail, and the yards he measures about the waist; only think of the gigantic involutions of his intestines, where they lie in him like great cables and hawsers coiled away in the subterranean orlop-deck of a line-of-battle-ship.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 104. The Fossil Whale.
10  There you stand, a hundred feet above the silent decks, striding along the deep, as if the masts were gigantic stilts, while beneath you and between your legs, as it were, swim the hugest monsters of the sea, even as ships once sailed between the boots of the famous Colossus at old Rhodes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
11  As in the hurricane that sweeps the plain, men fly the neighborhood of some lone, gigantic elm, whose very height and strength but render it so much the more unsafe, because so much the more a mark for thunderbolts; so at those last words of Ahab's many of the mariners did run from him in a terror of dismay.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
12  Whereupon planting his feet firmly against two opposite planks of the boat, the gigantic negro, stooping a little, presented his flat palm to Flask's foot, and then putting Flask's hand on his hearse-plumed head and bidding him spring as he himself should toss, with one dexterous fling landed the little man high and dry on his shoulders.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.