GIRL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - girl in Hard Times
1  The girl curtseyed, and sat down.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
2  Let the girl understand the fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
3  Sissy, my good girl, leave us alone a minute.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
4  Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I
5  From the first he had sought to conciliate that gentleman, for the sake of the deserted girl.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
6  He was a very light porter indeed; as light as in the days when he blinkingly defined a horse, for girl number twenty.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
7  In the drawing-room of which mansion, there presently entered to them the most remarkable girl Mr. James Harthouse had ever seen.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
8  They followed the girl up some steep corner-stairs without meeting any one, and stopped in the dark while she went on for a candle.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
9  Somehow or other, he had become possessed by an idea that there was something in this girl which could hardly be set forth in a tabular form.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
10  Almost as they did so, there came running round the corner of the street at a quick pace and with a frightened look, a girl whom Mr. Gradgrind recognized.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
11  They expected every moment to hear Merrylegs give tongue, but the highly trained performing dog had not barked when the girl and the candle appeared together.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
12  In the innocence of her brave affection, and the brimming up of her old devoted spirit, the once deserted girl shone like a beautiful light upon the darkness of the other.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
13  The girl believed that her father had not deserted her; she lived in the hope that he would come back, and in the faith that he would be made the happier by her remaining where she was.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
14  There were times when he could not read the face he had studied so long; and when this lonely girl was a greater mystery to him, than any woman of the world with a ring of satellites to help her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
15  But, whereas the girl was so dark-eyed and dark-haired, that she seemed to receive a deeper and more lustrous colour from the sun, when it shone upon her, the boy was so light-eyed and light-haired that the self-same rays appeared to draw out of him what little colour he ever possessed.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
16  There was an air of jaded sullenness in them both, and particularly in the girl: yet, struggling through the dissatisfaction of her face, there was a light with nothing to rest upon, a fire with nothing to burn, a starved imagination keeping life in itself somehow, which brightened its expression.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
17  I, who came here to inform the father of the poor girl, Jupe, that she could not be received at the school any more, in consequence of there being practical objections, into which I need not enter, to the reception there of the children of persons so employed, am prepared in these altered circumstances to make a proposal.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
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