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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - go in Pride and Prejudice
1  If he wishes to avoid seeing me, he must go.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
2  Pray go to see them, with Sir William and Maria.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
3  "We will go as far as Meryton with you," said Catherine and Lydia.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
4  But if I go on, I shall displease you by saying what I think of persons you esteem.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
5  When the clock struck three, Elizabeth felt that she must go, and very unwillingly said so.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  Mr. Hurst had therefore nothing to do, but to stretch himself on one of the sofas and go to sleep.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
7  When my niece Georgiana went to Ramsgate last summer, I made a point of her having two men-servants go with her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
8  Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know, they visit no newcomers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
9  Jane was therefore obliged to go on horseback, and her mother attended her to the door with many cheerful prognostics of a bad day.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
10  A deeper shade of hauteur overspread his features, but he said not a word, and Elizabeth, though blaming herself for her own weakness, could not go on.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
11  Elizabeth, feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her, though the carriage was not to be had; and as she was no horsewoman, walking was her only alternative.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
12  He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 2
13  Choose properly, choose a gentlewoman for my sake; and for your own, let her be an active, useful sort of person, not brought up high, but able to make a small income go a good way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
14  Bingley was all grateful pleasure, and he readily engaged for taking the earliest opportunity of waiting on her, after his return from London, whither he was obliged to go the next day for a short time.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
15  She was still very poorly, and Elizabeth would not quit her at all, till late in the evening, when she had the comfort of seeing her sleep, and when it seemed to her rather right than pleasant that she should go downstairs herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
16  She could not think of Darcy's leaving Kent without remembering that his cousin was to go with him; but Colonel Fitzwilliam had made it clear that he had no intentions at all, and agreeable as he was, she did not mean to be unhappy about him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
17  Mrs. Collins, seeing that she was really unwell, did not press her to go and as much as possible prevented her husband from pressing her; but Mr. Collins could not conceal his apprehension of Lady Catherine's being rather displeased by her staying at home.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
18  Very few days passed in which Mr. Collins did not walk to Rosings, and not many in which his wife did not think it necessary to go likewise; and till Elizabeth recollected that there might be other family livings to be disposed of, she could not understand the sacrifice of so many hours.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
19  It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the care of their sister, that she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
20  They agreed that Mrs. Bennet should only hear of the departure of the family, without being alarmed on the score of the gentleman's conduct; but even this partial communication gave her a great deal of concern, and she bewailed it as exceedingly unlucky that the ladies should happen to go away just as they were all getting so intimate together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21