GOOD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - good in David Copperfield
1  You are going for your own good.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
2  We ate a good deal, and slept a good deal.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  This was a good freshener to my presence of mind, as a beginning.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
4  As well as I could make out, she had come for good, and had no intention of ever going again.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
5  Why then I'll as good as bet a guinea,' said Peggotty, intent upon my face, 'that she'll let us go.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
6  I write of her just as she was when I had gone to bed after this talk, and she came to bid me good night.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
7  You'll make yourself ill,' said Miss Betsey, 'and you know that will not be good either for you or for my god-daughter.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
8  I have a great many defects, I know, and it's very good of you, Edward, with your strength of mind, to endeavour to correct them for me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
9  Mr. Copperfield was very kind to me, and took a great deal of notice of me, and paid me a good deal of attention, and at last proposed to me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
10  You have a good deal of intelligence for a little fellow,' he said, with a grave smile that belonged to him, 'and you understood me very well, I see.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
11  I know it was a good squeeze, because, being very plump, whenever she made any little exertion after she was dressed, some of the buttons on the back of her gown flew off.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
12  Again, I wonder with a sudden fear whether it is likely that our good old clergyman can be wrong, and Mr. and Miss Murdstone right, and that all the angels in Heaven can be destroying angels.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
13  There seemed to be something very comical in the reputation of Mr. Brooks of Sheffield, for both the gentlemen laughed heartily when he was mentioned, and Mr. Murdstone was a good deal amused also.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  I was so sorry for my mother's distress; but I groped my way out, and groped my way up to my room in the dark, without even having the heart to say good night to Peggotty, or to get a candle from her.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
15  Miss Murdstone was good enough to take me out to the cart, and to say on the way that she hoped I would repent, before I came to a bad end; and then I got into the cart, and the lazy horse walked off with it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
16  I was obliged to get her to repeat it, for she spoke it the first time quite down my throat, in consequence of my having forgotten to take my mouth away from the keyhole and put my ear there; and though her words tickled me a good deal, I didn't hear them.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
17  I look from Mr. Chillip, in his Sunday neckcloth, to the pulpit; and think what a good place it would be to play in, and what a castle it would make, with another boy coming up the stairs to attack it, and having the velvet cushion with the tassels thrown down on his head.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
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