GOOD in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - good in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  This play was good enough for us, Harry.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
2  Yes, Mr. Gray, the gods have been good to you.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  But you must not think I don't like good music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
4  There is no such thing as a good influence, Mr. Gray.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
5  I never talk during music--at least, during good music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  My wife is very good at it--much better, in fact, than I am.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  Women have no appreciation of good looks; at least, good women have not.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
8  But he must be very good, and not lose his temper, or spend his money foolishly.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
9  His principles were out of date, but there was a good deal to be said for his prejudices.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
10  I know, now, that when one loses one's good looks, whatever they may be, one loses everything.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  I believe that you are really a very good husband, but that you are thoroughly ashamed of your own virtues.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  The longer I live, Dorian, the more keenly I feel that whatever was good enough for our fathers is not good enough for us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
13  I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their good intellects.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
14  "They say that when good Americans die they go to Paris," chuckled Sir Thomas, who had a large wardrobe of Humour's cast-off clothes.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
15  In fact I consider you extremely dangerous, and if anything happens to our good duchess, we shall all look on you as being primarily responsible.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
16  There is nothing that art cannot express, and I know that the work I have done, since I met Dorian Gray, is good work, is the best work of my life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
17  "Just turn your head a little more to the right, Dorian, like a good boy," said the painter, deep in his work and conscious only that a look had come into the lad's face that he had never seen there before.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
18  Opposite was the Duchess of Harley, a lady of admirable good-nature and good temper, much liked by every one who knew her, and of those ample architectural proportions that in women who are not duchesses are described by contemporary historians as stoutness.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
19  Fortunately for him she had on the other side Lord Faudel, a most intelligent middle-aged mediocrity, as bald as a ministerial statement in the House of Commons, with whom she was conversing in that intensely earnest manner which is the one unpardonable error, as he remarked once himself, that all really good people fall into, and from which none of them ever quite escape.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
20  His father had been our ambassador at Madrid when Isabella was young and Prim unthought of, but had retired from the diplomatic service in a capricious moment of annoyance on not being offered the Embassy at Paris, a post to which he considered that he was fully entitled by reason of his birth, his indolence, the good English of his dispatches, and his inordinate passion for pleasure.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3