GOOD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - good in Wuthering Heights
1  But he was too good to be thoroughly unhappy long.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
2  It is right to establish a good understanding at the beginning.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
3  She beat Hareton, or any child, at a good passionate fit of crying.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
4  It hurt me to think the master should be made uncomfortable by his own good deed.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
5  The master was too gloomy to seek companionship with any people, good or bad; and he is yet.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
6  I took my dingy volume by the scroop, and hurled it into the dog-kennel, vowing I hated a good book.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
7  A propensity to be saucy was one; and a perverse will, that indulged children invariably acquire, whether they be good tempered or cross.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
8  Even you, Nelly, if we have a dispute sometimes, you back Isabella at once; and I yield like a foolish mother: I call her a darling, and flatter her into a good temper.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
9  You need not be afraid of harming him: though I hate him as much as ever, he did me a good turn a short time since that will make my conscience tender of breaking his neck.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
10  He went down: I set him a stool by the fire, and offered him a quantity of good things: but he was sick and could eat little, and my attempts to entertain him were thrown away.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
11  Only, Catherine, do me this justice: believe that if I might be as sweet, and as kind, and as good as you are, I would be; as willingly, and more so, than as happy and as healthy.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
12  At other times, she would turn petulantly away, and hide her face in her hands, or even push him off angrily; and then he took care to let her alone, for he was certain of doing no good.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
13  But he was too timid in giving satisfactory reasons for his wish that she should shun connection with the household of the Heights, and Catherine liked good reasons for every restraint that harassed her petted will.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
14  And I, through pardonable weakness, refrained from correcting the error; asking myself what good there would be in disturbing his last moments with information that he had neither power nor opportunity to turn to account.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
15  I knew that you could not keep up an acquaintance with your cousin without being brought into contact with him; and I knew he would detest you on my account; so for your own good, and nothing else, I took precautions that you should not see Linton again.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
16  I was cogitating what the mystery might be, and determined Catherine should never suffer to benefit him or any one else, by my good will; when, hearing a rustle among the ling, I looked up and saw Mr. Heathcliff almost close upon us, descending the Heights.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
17  I got together good store of dainties, and slung them in a basket on one side of the saddle; and she sprang up as gay as a fairy, sheltered by her wide-brimmed hat and gauze veil from the July sun, and trotted off with a merry laugh, mocking my cautious counsel to avoid galloping, and come back early.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
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