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Quotes from House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
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1  There was a great gulf fixed between today and yesterday.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 13
2  And I'm sure there is no truth in the horrid things people say; but she HAS been spending a great deal of money this winter.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 11
3  THEY'RE still in the elementary stage; an Italian Prince is a great deal more than a Prince to them, and they're always on the brink of taking a courier for one.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 2
4  There was nothing especially arduous in this round of religious obligations; but it stood for a fraction of that great bulk of boredom which loomed across her path.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 5
5  He had a confused sense that she must have cost a great deal to make, that a great many dull and ugly people must, in some mysterious way, have been sacrificed to produce her.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 1
6  She did, at least, a great deal to adorn it; and as he watched the bright security with which she bore herself, he smiled to think that he should have fancied her in need of help.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 3
7  The great hall was empty but for the knot of dogs by the fire, who, taking in at a glance the outdoor aspect of Miss Bart, were upon her at once with lavish offers of companionship.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 5
8  He spoke pantingly, like a tired runner, with breaks of exhaustion between his words; and through the breaks she caught, as through the shifting rents of a fog, great golden vistas of peace and safety.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 6
9  She had learned in advance that the presence of a large party would protect her from too great assiduity on Trenor's part, and his wife's telegraphic "come by all means" seemed to assure her of her usual welcome.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 12
10  It had always seemed to Selden that experience offered a great deal besides the sentimental adventure, yet he could vividly conceive of a love which should broaden and deepen till it became the central fact of life.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
11  It was rather that he had preserved a certain social detachment, a happy air of viewing the show objectively, of having points of contact outside the great gilt cage in which they were all huddled for the mob to gape at.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 5
12  On the crimson carpet a deer-hound and two or three spaniels dozed luxuriously before the fire, and the light from the great central lantern overhead shed a brightness on the women's hair and struck sparks from their jewels as they moved.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 3
13  Nothing would have induced her to undergo the exertion and fatigue of attending the Van Osburgh wedding, but so great was her interest in the event that, having heard two versions of it, she now prepared to extract a third from her niece.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 9
14  Between the two, the waters of the bay were furrowed by a light coming and going of pleasure-craft, through which, just at the culminating moment of luncheon, the majestic advance of a great steam-yacht drew the company's attention from the peas.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 1
15  The sudden escape from a stifling hotel in a dusty deserted city to the space and luxury of a great country-house fanned by sea breezes, had produced a state of moral lassitude agreeable enough after the nervous tension and physical discomfort of the past weeks.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 5
16  Even Gerty Farish, who welcomed Lily's return with tender solicitude, would soon be preparing to join the aunt with whom she spent her summers on Lake George: only Lily herself remained without plan or purpose, stranded in a backwater of the great current of pleasure.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 5
17  Mrs. Haffen raised a suspicious glance: she was too experienced not to know that the traffic she was engaged in had perils as great as its rewards, and she had a vision of the elaborate machinery of revenge which a word of this commanding young lady's might set in motion.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 9
18  Her small pale face seemed the mere setting of a pair of dark exaggerated eyes, of which the visionary gaze contrasted curiously with her self-assertive tone and gestures; so that, as one of her friends observed, she was like a disembodied spirit who took up a great deal of room.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 2
19  Lily, with the flavour of Selden's caravan tea on her lips, had no great fancy to drown it in the railway brew which seemed such nectar to her companion; but, rightly judging that one of the charms of tea is the fact of drinking it together, she proceeded to give the last touch to Mr. Gryce's enjoyment by smiling at him across her lifted cup.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 2
20  If Morpeth, whose social indolence was as great as his artistic activity, had abandoned himself to the easy current of the Gormer existence, where the minor exactions of politeness were unknown or ignored, and a man could either break his engagements, or keep them in a painting-jacket and slippers, he still preserved his sense of differences, and his appreciation of graces he had no time to cultivate.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 5