GREAT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - great in Pride and Prejudice
1  She is a great deal too ill to be moved.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
2  But that is one great difference between us.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
3  I have great hopes of finding him quite the reverse.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
4  It is a pity that great ladies in general are not more like her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
5  Elizabeth, at work in the opposite corner, saw it all with great delight.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
6  Mr. Collins was punctual to his time, and was received with great politeness by the whole family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
7  Between him and Darcy there was a very steady friendship, in spite of great opposition of character.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
8  I cannot see that London has any great advantage over the country, for my part, except the shops and public places.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  I assure you, that if Darcy were not such a great tall fellow, in comparison with myself, I should not pay him half so much deference.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
10  She was shown into the breakfast-parlour, where all but Jane were assembled, and where her appearance created a great deal of surprise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
11  That is an uncommon advantage, and uncommon I hope it will continue, for it would be a great loss to me to have many such acquaintances.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
12  She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
13  She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man; and yet that he should look at her because he disliked her, was still more strange.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
14  Miss Bingley saw, or suspected enough to be jealous; and her great anxiety for the recovery of her dear friend Jane received some assistance from her desire of getting rid of Elizabeth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
15  I believe her to be both in a great degree," replied Wickham; "I have not seen her for many years, but I very well remember that I never liked her, and that her manners were dictatorial and insolent.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
16  I knew it to be a most respectable, agreeable corps, and my friend Denny tempted me further by his account of their present quarters, and the very great attentions and excellent acquaintances Meryton had procured them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
17  We are not on friendly terms, and it always gives me pain to meet him, but I have no reason for avoiding him but what I might proclaim before all the world, a sense of very great ill-usage, and most painful regrets at his being what he is.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
18  Jane pictured to herself a happy evening in the society of her two friends, and the attentions of her brother; and Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr. Wickham, and of seeing a confirmation of everything in Mr. Darcy's look and behaviour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
19  The subjection in which his father had brought him up had given him originally great humility of manner; but it was now a good deal counteracted by the self-conceit of a weak head, living in retirement, and the consequential feelings of early and unexpected prosperity.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
20  It had not been very great; he had lost every point; but when Mrs. Phillips began to express her concern thereupon, he assured her with much earnest gravity that it was not of the least importance, that he considered the money as a mere trifle, and begged that she would not make herself uneasy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16