GREAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - great in Sense and Sensibility
1  Elinor's happiness was not so great.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
2  Marianne turned away in great confusion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
3  But Edward had no turn for great men or barouches.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
4  The resemblance between her and her mother was strikingly great.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  She had great satisfaction in replying that she was going into Devonshire.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
6  Why, to be sure," said her husband, very gravely, "that would make great difference.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
7  A great deal too handsome, in my opinion, for any place THEY can ever afford to live in.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
8  He has seen a great deal of the world; has been abroad, has read, and has a thinking mind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
9  High hills rose immediately behind, and at no great distance on each side; some of which were open downs, the others cultivated and woody.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
10  His mother wished to interest him in political concerns, to get him into parliament, or to see him connected with some of the great men of the day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
11  Mrs. Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  Some more of the Careys came to dinner, and they had the pleasure of sitting down nearly twenty to table, which Sir John observed with great contentment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
13  As soon as they left the dining-room, Elinor enquired of her about it; and great was her surprise when she found that every circumstance related by Mrs. Jennings was perfectly true.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
14  I have known a great deal of the trouble of annuities; for my mother was clogged with the payment of three to old superannuated servants by my father's will, and it is amazing how disagreeable she found it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
15  They contained a noble piece of water; a sail on which was to a form a great part of the morning's amusement; cold provisions were to be taken, open carriages only to be employed, and every thing conducted in the usual style of a complete party of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
16  But her death, which happened ten years before his own, produced a great alteration in his home; for to supply her loss, he invited and received into his house the family of his nephew Mr. Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
17  Most grateful did Elinor feel to Lady Middleton for observing, at this moment, "that it rained very hard," though she believed the interruption to proceed less from any attention to her, than from her ladyship's great dislike of all such inelegant subjects of raillery as delighted her husband and mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
18  I have seen a great deal of him, have studied his sentiments and heard his opinion on subjects of literature and taste; and, upon the whole, I venture to pronounce that his mind is well-informed, enjoyment of books exceedingly great, his imagination lively, his observation just and correct, and his taste delicate and pure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
19  She blushed at this hint; but it was even visibly gratifying to her; and after a ten minutes' interval of earnest thought, she came to her sister again, and said with great good humour, "Perhaps, Elinor, it WAS rather ill-judged in me to go to Allenham; but Mr. Willoughby wanted particularly to shew me the place; and it is a charming house, I assure you."
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
20  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4