GREAT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - great in Wuthering Heights
1  A great addition, in my eyes, was his being left without an heir.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
2  I am sure you have thought a great deal more than the generality of servants think.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
3  At Wuthering Heights it always sounded on quiet days following a great thaw or a season of steady rain.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
4  He got through, and the doctor affirmed it was in a great measure owing to me, and praised me for my care.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
5  At least, I suppose the weeping was on both sides; as it seemed Heathcliff could weep on a great occasion like this.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
6  I might have seen there was too great a disparity between the ages of the parties to make it likely that they were man and wife.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
7  It required a great deal of labour to satisfy the old man that Heathcliff was not the aggressor; especially with my hardly-wrung replies.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
8  He retained a great deal of the reserve for which his boyhood was remarkable; and that served to repress all startling demonstrations of feeling.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
9  She had never spoken a word to her sister-in-law for three days; but she had likewise dropped her fretful complaining, and we found it a great comfort.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
10  With great grumblings, the fellow rose, and preceded me in my ascent: we mounted to the garrets; he opened a door, now and then, to look into the apartments we passed.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
11  By his knack of sermonising and pious discoursing, he contrived to make a great impression on Mr. Earnshaw; and the more feeble the master became, the more influence he gained.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
12  Mr. Linton summoned me, and with great difficulty, and after resorting to many means, we managed to restore her to sensation; but she was all bewildered; she sighed, and moaned, and knew nobody.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
13  I did not feel as if I were in the company of a creature of my own species: it appeared that he would not understand, though I spoke to him; so I stood off, and held my tongue, in great perplexity.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
14  The curtains were still looped up at one corner, and I resumed my station as spy; because, if Catherine had wished to return, I intended shattering their great glass panes to a million of fragments, unless they let her out.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
15  I thought as I lay there, with my head against that table leg, and my eyes dimly discerning the grey square of the window, that I was enclosed in the oak-panelled bed at home; and my heart ached with some great grief which, just waking, I could not recollect.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
16  There was a great fire, and that was all the light in the huge apartment, whose floor had grown a uniform grey; and the once brilliant pewter-dishes, which used to attract my gaze when I was a girl, partook of a similar obscurity, created by tarnish and dust.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
17  She kept wandering to and fro, from the gate to the door, in a state of agitation which permitted no repose; and at length took up a permanent situation on one side of the wall, near the road: where, heedless of my expostulations and the growling thunder, and the great drops that began to plash around her, she remained, calling at intervals, and then listening, and then crying outright.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.