GREATNESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - greatness in Great Expectations
1  However, her temper was greatly improved, and she was patient.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
2  I was greatly dejected and distressed, but in an incoherent wholesale sort of way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
3  In watching his face, I made quite a firework of the Aged's sausage, and greatly discomposed both my own attention and Wemmick's; for which I apologized.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
4  Mr. Wopsle had greatly alarmed me more than once, by his blowing and hard breathing; but I knew the sounds by this time, and could dissociate them from the object of pursuit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
5  This greatly distressed Mrs. Pocket, who burst into tears on receiving the note, and said that it was an extraordinary thing that the neighbors couldn't mind their own business.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
6  Her sight was disturbed, so that she saw objects multiplied, and grasped at visionary teacups and wineglasses instead of the realities; her hearing was greatly impaired; her memory also; and her speech was unintelligible.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
7  What lay heaviest on my mind was, the consideration that six days intervened between me and the day of departure; for I could not divest myself of a misgiving that something might happen to London in the meanwhile, and that, when I got there, it would be either greatly deteriorated or clean gone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
8  When he had at last done and had appointed to send the articles to Mr. Pumblechook's on the Thursday evening, he said, with his hand upon the parlor lock, "I know, sir, that London gentlemen cannot be expected to patronize local work, as a rule; but if you would give me a turn now and then in the quality of a townsman, I should greatly esteem it."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX