HAIR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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 Current Search - hair in The Great Gatsby
1  Daisy went to the mirror and stood with her back to us, fixing her hair.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  The hair in his nostrils quivered slightly and as he shook his head his eyes filled with tears.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  Now and then she moved and he changed his arm a little and once he kissed her dark shining hair.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 8
4  His tanned skin was drawn attractively tight on his face and his short hair looked as though it were trimmed every day.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
5  Daisy took the brush with delight and smoothed her hair, whereupon Gatsby sat down and shaded his eyes and began to laugh.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 5
6  A small, flat-nosed Jew raised his large head and regarded me with two fine growths of hair which luxuriated in either nostril.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 4
7  We all looked in silence at Mrs. Wilson who removed a strand of hair from over her eyes and looked back at us with a brilliant smile.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 2
8  Thirty--the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7
9  Sometimes in the course of gay parties women used to rub champagne into his hair; for himself he formed the habit of letting liquor alone.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 6
10  A white ashen dust veiled his dark suit and his pale hair as it veiled everything in the vicinity--except his wife, who moved close to Tom.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 2
11  The sister, Catherine, was a slender, worldly girl of about thirty with a solid sticky bob of red hair and a complexion powdered milky white.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 2
12  A damp streak of hair lay like a dash of blue paint across her cheek and her hand was wet with glistening drops as I took it to help her from the car.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 5
13  The lamp-light, bright on his boots and dull on the autumn-leaf yellow of her hair, glinted along the paper as she turned a page with a flutter of slender muscles in her arms.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
14  He had slept through the heat until after five, when he strolled over to the garage and found George Wilson sick in his office--really sick, pale as his own pale hair and shaking all over.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  "You've dyed your hair since then," remarked Jordan, and I started but the girls had moved casually on and her remark was addressed to the premature moon, produced like the supper, no doubt, out of a caterer's basket.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
16  She was dressed to play golf and I remember thinking she looked like a good illustration, her chin raised a little, jauntily, her hair the color of an autumn leaf, her face the same brown tint as the fingerless glove on her knee.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 9
17  The last swimmers have come in from the beach now and are dressing upstairs; the cars from New York are parked five deep in the drive, and already the halls and salons and verandas are gaudy with primary colors and hair shorn in strange new ways and shawls beyond the dreams of Castile.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
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