HAPPIEST in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - happiest in Pride and Prejudice
1  I am the happiest creature in the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
2  They seemed each of them to have the happiest memories in the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 51
3  It is settled between us already, that we are to be the happiest couple in the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 59
4  To be sure, it would have been more for the advantage of conversation had Miss Lydia Bennet come upon the town; or, as the happiest alternative, been secluded from the world, in some distant farmhouse.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
5  Jane could have no reserves from Elizabeth, where confidence would give pleasure; and instantly embracing her, acknowledged, with the liveliest emotion, that she was the happiest creature in the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
6  The pain of separation, however, might be alleviated on his side, by preparations for the reception of his bride; as he had reason to hope, that shortly after his return into Hertfordshire, the day would be fixed that was to make him the happiest of men.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
7  Her tour to the Lakes was now the object of her happiest thoughts; it was her best consolation for all the uncomfortable hours which the discontentedness of her mother and Kitty made inevitable; and could she have included Jane in the scheme, every part of it would have been perfect.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 42
8  In as short a time as Mr. Collins's long speeches would allow, everything was settled between them to the satisfaction of both; and as they entered the house he earnestly entreated her to name the day that was to make him the happiest of men; and though such a solicitation must be waived for the present, the lady felt no inclination to trifle with his happiness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22