HAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - hat in Wuthering Heights
1  The insulted visitor moved to the spot where he had laid his hat, pale and with a quivering lip.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
2  This exclamation was caused by her pushing the hat from her head, and retreating to the chimney out of my reach.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
3  In stretching to pull them, her hat fell off; and as the door was locked, she proposed scrambling down to recover it.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
4  Joseph objected at first; she was too much in earnest, however, to suffer contradiction; and at last he placed his hat on his head, and walked grumbling forth.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
5  He was donned in his Sunday garments, with his most sanctimonious and sourest face, and, holding his hat in one hand, and his stick in the other, he proceeded to clean his shoes on the mat.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
6  She put the door gently too, slipped off her snowy shoes, untied her hat, and was proceeding, unconscious of my espionage, to lay aside her mantle, when I suddenly rose and revealed myself.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
7  I picked up her hat, and approached to reinstate it; but perceiving that the people of the house took her part, she commenced capering round the room; and on my giving chase, ran like a mouse over and under and behind the furniture, rendering it ridiculous for me to pursue.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
8  I got together good store of dainties, and slung them in a basket on one side of the saddle; and she sprang up as gay as a fairy, sheltered by her wide-brimmed hat and gauze veil from the July sun, and trotted off with a merry laugh, mocking my cautious counsel to avoid galloping, and come back early.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII