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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  She gave her hand to Sissy, as if she meant with her help too.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
2  Nobody was ever on any account to give anybody anything, or render anybody help without purchase.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
3  A moment and she would be past all help, let the whole world wake and come about her with its utmost power.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
4  I think Tom may be gradually falling into trouble, and I wish to stretch out a helping hand to him from the depths of my wicked experience.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
5  After they had waited some time, straggling people who had heard of the accident began to come up; then the real help of implements began to arrive.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
6  The wide prospect, so beautiful in its stillness but a few minutes ago, almost carried despair to her brave heart, as she rose and looked all round her, seeing no help.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
7  There were times when he could not read the face he had studied so long; and when this lonely girl was a greater mystery to him, than any woman of the world with a ring of satellites to help her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
8  Yet there was a remarkable gentleness and childishness about these people, a special inaptitude for any kind of sharp practice, and an untiring readiness to help and pity one another, deserving often of as much respect, and always of as much generous construction, as the every-day virtues of any class of people in the world.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V