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Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - his in Wuthering Heights
1  Heathcliff kicked his to the same place.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  Vinegar-faced Joseph projected his head from a round window of the barn.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
3  But Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
4  Mr. Heathcliff followed, his accidental merriment expiring quickly in his habitual moroseness.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
5  I was sick exceedingly, and dizzy, and faint; and thus compelled perforce to accept lodgings under his roof.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
6  This was worse than before: the youth grew crimson, and clenched his fist, with every appearance of a meditated assault.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
7  I guessed, however, by his irregular and intercepted breathing, that he struggled to vanquish an excess of violent emotion.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  He had his private manner of interpreting the phrase, and it seemed necessary the brother should sin different sins on every occasion.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
9  He fixed his eye on me longer than I cared to return the stare, for fear I might be tempted either to box his ears or render my hilarity audible.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  Heathcliff stood near the entrance, in his shirt and trousers; with a candle dripping over his fingers, and his face as white as the wall behind him.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
11  Mr. Heathcliff may have entirely dissimilar reasons for keeping his hand out of the way when he meets a would-be acquaintance, to those which actuate me.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
12  The canisters were almost out of her reach; I made a motion to aid her; she turned upon me as a miser might turn if any one attempted to assist him in counting his gold.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  The first creak of the oak startled him like an electric shock: the light leaped from his hold to a distance of some feet, and his agitation was so extreme, that he could hardly pick it up.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
14  He turned, as he spoke, a peculiar look in her direction: a look of hatred; unless he has a most perverse set of facial muscles that will not, like those of other people, interpret the language of his soul.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  Such an individual seated in his arm-chair, his mug of ale frothing on the round table before him, is to be seen in any circuit of five or six miles among these hills, if you go at the right time after dinner.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
16  He told Zillah to give me a glass of brandy, and then passed on to the inner room; while she condoled with me on my sorry predicament, and having obeyed his orders, whereby I was somewhat revived, ushered me to bed.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
17  In the absence of clear proofs of his condition, I deemed it best to abstain from noticing his curious conduct; and, five minutes afterwards, the entrance of Heathcliff relieved me, in some measure, from my uncomfortable state.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
18  I bowed and returned the pledge; beginning to perceive that it would be foolish to sit sulking for the misbehaviour of a pack of curs; besides, I felt loth to yield the fellow further amusement at my expense; since his humour took that turn.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
19  Meanwhile, the young man had slung on to his person a decidedly shabby upper garment, and, erecting himself before the blaze, looked down on me from the corner of his eyes, for all the world as if there were some mortal feud unavenged between us.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
20  He is a dark-skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I