HOPE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - hope in Sense and Sensibility
1  "I hope not, I believe not," cried Elinor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
2  But, however, I hope you will think better of it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
3  "I hope he has had no bad news," said Lady Middleton.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
4  I have only to hope that they may be proportionately short.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
5  I have no wish to be distinguished; and have every reason to hope I never shall.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
6  It is but a cottage," she continued, "but I hope to see many of my friends in it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
7  "No bad news, Colonel, I hope;" said Mrs. Jennings, as soon as he entered the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
8  I hope, Marianne," continued Elinor, "you do not consider him as deficient in general taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
9  Willoughby may undoubtedly have very sufficient reasons for his conduct, and I will hope that he has.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
10  But I will not suppose this possible, and I hope very soon to receive your personal assurance of its being otherwise.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
11  I hope, from the bottom of my heart, he won't keep her waiting much longer, for it is quite grievous to see her look so ill and forlorn.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
12  The card-table was then placed, and Elinor began to wonder at herself for having ever entertained a hope of finding time for conversation at the park.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
13  They were interrupted by the entrance of Margaret; and Elinor was then at liberty to think over the representations of her mother, to acknowledge the probability of many, and hope for the justice of all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
14  But Mrs. Dashwood began shortly to give over every hope of the kind, and to be convinced, from the general drift of his discourse, that his assistance extended no farther than their maintenance for six months at Norland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
15  Her mother too, in whose mind not one speculative thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospect of riches, was led before the end of a week to hope and expect it; and secretly to congratulate herself on having gained two such sons-in-law as Edward and Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
16  Mr. Dashwood's disappointment was, at first, severe; but his temper was cheerful and sanguine; and he might reasonably hope to live many years, and by living economically, lay by a considerable sum from the produce of an estate already large, and capable of almost immediate improvement.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
17  A woman of seven and twenty," said Marianne, after pausing a moment, "can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small, I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the sake of the provision and security of a wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
18  Yet as she was convinced that Marianne's affection for Willoughby, could leave no hope of Colonel Brandon's success, whatever the event of that affection might be, and at the same time wished to shield her conduct from censure, she thought it most prudent and kind, after some consideration, to say more than she really knew or believed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
19  Mrs. Jennings, who had watched them with pleasure while they were talking, and who expected to see the effect of Miss Dashwood's communication, in such an instantaneous gaiety on Colonel Brandon's side, as might have become a man in the bloom of youth, of hope and happiness, saw him, with amazement, remain the whole evening more serious and thoughtful than usual.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
20  They were engaged about the end of that time to attend Lady Middleton to a party, from which Mrs. Jennings was kept away by the indisposition of her youngest daughter; and for this party, Marianne, wholly dispirited, careless of her appearance, and seeming equally indifferent whether she went or staid, prepared, without one look of hope or one expression of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28