HOPE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - hope in Wuthering Heights
1  I hoped heartily we should have peace now.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
2  On only one condition can I hope to forgive him.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
3  One hoped, and the other despaired: they chose their own lots, and were righteously doomed to endure them.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
4  He recalled her memory with ardent, tender love, and hopeful aspiring to the better world; where he doubted not she was gone.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
5  I hope you are satisfied, Miss Cathy, that you are not the person to benefit him; and that his condition of health is not occasioned by attachment to you.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
6  I walked round the yard, and through a wicket, to another door, at which I took the liberty of knocking, in hopes some more civil servant might show himself.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
7  When his ship struck, the captain abandoned his post; and the crew, instead of trying to save her, rushed into riot and confusion, leaving no hope for their luckless vessel.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
8  Let me hope my constitution is almost peculiar: my dear mother used to say I should never have a comfortable home; and only last summer I proved myself perfectly unworthy of one.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
9  They entirely refused to have it in bed with them, or even in their room; and I had no more sense, so I put it on the landing of the stairs, hoping it might be gone on the morrow.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
10  The doctor, on examining the case for himself, spoke hopefully to him of its having a favourable termination, if we could only preserve around her perfect and constant tranquillity.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
11  It struck beneath my ear, and stopped the sentence I was uttering; but, pulling it out, I sprang to the door and delivered another; which I hope went a little deeper than his missile.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
12  Her hope was that Linton might be left with him, as he had been with her: his father, she would fain convince herself, had no desire to assume the burden of his maintenance or education.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
13  Mr. and Mrs. Earnshaw watched anxiously their meeting; thinking it would enable them to judge, in some measure, what grounds they had for hoping to succeed in separating the two friends.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
14  Shame at her scorn, and hope of her approval, were his first prompters to higher pursuits; and instead of guarding him from one and winning him to the other, his endeavours to raise himself had produced just the contrary result.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
15  Her countenance grew wan with watching and sorrow, and my master gladly dismissed her to what he flattered himself would be a happy change of scene and society; drawing comfort from the hope that she would not now be left entirely alone after his death.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
16  Heathcliff had gone to loose the beast, and shift it to his own stall; he was passing behind it, when Hindley finished his speech by knocking him under its feet, and without stopping to examine whether his hopes were fulfilled, ran away as fast as he could.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  But Heathcliff affirms his principal reason for resuming a connection with his ancient persecutor is a wish to install himself in quarters at walking distance from the Grange, and an attachment to the house where we lived together; and likewise a hope that I shall have more opportunities of seeing him there than I could have if he settled in Gimmerton.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.