HOUSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - house in A Christmas Carol
1  "The house is yonder," Scrooge exclaimed.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
2  The sound resounded through the house like thunder.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
3  In the afternoon he turned his steps towards his nephew's house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 5 THE END OF IT
4  They went, the Ghost and Scrooge, across the hall, to a door at the back of the house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
5  Scrooge then remembered to have heard that ghosts in haunted houses were described as dragging chains.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
6  It swung so softly in the outset that it scarcely made a sound; but soon it rang out loudly, and so did every bell in the house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
7  They entered poor Bob Cratchit's house,--the dwelling he had visited before,--and found the mother and the children seated round the fire.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
8  The fog and frost so hung about the black old gateway of the house, that it seemed as if the Genius of the Weather sat in mournful meditation on the threshold.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
9  There, all the children of the house were running out into the snow to meet their married sisters, brothers, cousins, uncles, aunts, and be the first to greet them.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
10  The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole, and was so dense without, that, although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
11  He lay, in the dark, empty house, with not a man, a woman, or a child to say he was kind to me in this or that, and for the memory of one kind word I will be kind to him.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
12  It was a large house, but one of broken fortunes: for the spacious offices were little used, their walls were damp and mossy, their windows broken, and their gates decayed.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
13  It is enough that by degrees, the children and their emotions got out of the parlour, and, by one stair at a time, up to the top of the house, where they went to bed, and so subsided.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
14  Such a bustle ensued that you might have thought a goose the rarest of all birds; a feathered phenomenon, to which a black swan was a matter of course--and, in truth, it was something very like it in that house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
15  But, if you had judged from the numbers of people on their way to friendly gatherings, you might have thought that no one was at home to give them welcome when they got there, instead of every house expecting company, and piling up its fires half-chimney high.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
16  They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely help fancying it must have run there when it was a young house, playing at hide-and-seek with other houses, and have forgotten the way out again.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
17  They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely help fancying it must have run there when it was a young house, playing at hide-and-seek with other houses, and have forgotten the way out again.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
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