HOUSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - house in Great Expectations
1  There was a clock in the outer wall of this house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  Nothing had been taken away from any part of the house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
3  The house seems to have been violently entered when Joe Gargery was out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
4  As it was almost noon, Joe and I held straight on to Miss Havisham's house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
5  It meant, when it was given, that whoever had this house could want nothing else.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  It was as if I had to make up my mind to leap from the top of a high house, or plunge into a great depth of water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
7  Within a quarter of an hour we came to Miss Havisham's house, which was of old brick, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  Not satisfied with a dry cleaning, she took to a pail and scrubbing-brush, and cleaned us out of house and home, so that we stood shivering in the back-yard.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
9  The most prominent object was a long table with a tablecloth spread on it, as if a feast had been in preparation when the house and the clocks all stopped together.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
10  I cannot conceive why everybody of his standing who visited at our house should always have put me through the same inflammatory process under similar circumstances.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
11  We were noticing this, and saying how that the mist rose with a change of wind from a certain quarter of our marshes, when we came upon a man, slouching under the lee of the turnpike house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
12  I found the same gate open, and I explored the garden, and even looked in at the windows of the detached house; but my view was suddenly stopped by the closed shutters within, and all was lifeless.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
13  She took no notice of me until she had the candle in her hand, when she looked over her shoulder, superciliously saying, "You are to come this way to-day," and took me to quite another part of the house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
14  Never questioning for a moment that the house was now empty, I looked in at another window, and found myself, to my great surprise, exchanging a broad stare with a pale young gentleman with red eyelids and light hair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
15  To stand in the dark in a mysterious passage of an unknown house, bawling Estella to a scornful young lady neither visible nor responsive, and feeling it a dreadful liberty so to roar out her name, was almost as bad as playing to order.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  After that, it became customary with us to have it as we moved about, and Estella would often join in; though the whole strain was so subdued, even when there were three of us, that it made less noise in the grim old house than the lightest breath of wind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
17  So unchanging was the dull old house, the yellow light in the darkened room, the faded spectre in the chair by the dressing-table glass, that I felt as if the stopping of the clocks had stopped Time in that mysterious place, and, while I and everything else outside it grew older, it stood still.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
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