IMAGINATION in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - imagination in Moby Dick
1  He did; and then it seemed to me that he was dogging us, but with what intent I could not for the life of me imagine.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. The Prophet.
2  There seems some ground to imagine that the great Kraken of Bishop Pontoppodan may ultimately resolve itself into Squid.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 59. Squid.
3  But in a matter like this, subtlety appeals to subtlety, and without imagination no man can follow another into these halls.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. The Whiteness of The Whale.
4  The Common People imagine, that by a secret Power bestowed by God upon the temple, no Whale can pass it without immediate death.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 104. The Fossil Whale.
5  But even stripped of these supernatural surmisings, there was enough in the earthly make and incontestable character of the monster to strike the imagination with unwonted power.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
6  And though, doubtless, some at least of the imaginative impressions about to be presented may have been shared by most men, yet few perhaps were entirely conscious of them at the time, and therefore may not be able to recall them now.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. The Whiteness of The Whale.
7  Now this Radney, I suppose, was as little of a coward, and as little inclined to any sort of nervous apprehensiveness touching his own person as any fearless, unthinking creature on land or on sea that you can conveniently imagine, gentlemen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
8  And what that is, we may soon gain some idea of, by imagining all the grave-yards, cemeteries, and family vaults of creation yielding up the live bodies of all the men, women, and children who were alive seventy-five years ago; and adding this countless host to the present human population of the globe.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 105. Does the Whale's Magnitude Diminish?—Will He ...