IMAGINATION in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - imagination in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  You used to stir my imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
2  Ordinary women never appeal to one's imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
3  It was the imagination that set remorse to dog the feet of sin.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
4  He saw them at night, and they troubled his imagination in the day.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
5  It was the imagination that made each crime bear its misshapen brood.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
6  Browning writes about that somewhere; but our own senses will imagine them for us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
7  Actual life was chaos, but there was something terribly logical in the imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
8  In the mystic offices to which such things were put, there was something that quickened his imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
9  What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
10  You are mad, I tell you--mad to imagine that I would raise a finger to help you, mad to make this monstrous confession.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
11  Besides, he had convinced himself that he had been the victim of a terror-stricken imagination, and looked back now on his fears with something of pity and not a little of contempt.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
12  The brain had its own food on which it battened, and the imagination, made grotesque by terror, twisted and distorted as a living thing by pain, danced like some foul puppet on a stand and grinned through moving masks.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
13  He felt that the eyes of Dorian Gray were fixed on him, and the consciousness that amongst his audience there was one whose temperament he wished to fascinate seemed to give his wit keenness and to lend colour to his imagination.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
14  What there was in it of the purely sensuous instinct of boyhood had been transformed by the workings of the imagination, changed into something that seemed to the lad himself to be remote from sense, and was for that very reason all the more dangerous.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
15  There were times when it appeared to Dorian Gray that the whole of history was merely the record of his own life, not as he had lived it in act and circumstance, but as his imagination had created it for him, as it had been in his brain and in his passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
16  It was true that as one watched life in its curious crucible of pain and pleasure, one could not wear over one's face a mask of glass, nor keep the sulphurous fumes from troubling the brain and making the imagination turbid with monstrous fancies and misshapen dreams.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
17  Well, after a few days the thing left my studio, and as soon as I had got rid of the intolerable fascination of its presence, it seemed to me that I had been foolish in imagining that I had seen anything in it, more than that you were extremely good-looking and that I could paint.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.