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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  Facts alone are wanted in life.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I
2  Sheds coat in the spring; in marshy countries, sheds hoofs, too.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
3  Mr. Gradgrind walked homeward from the school, in a state of considerable satisfaction.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
4  You are not to have, in any object of use or ornament, what would be a contradiction in fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
5  No little Gradgrind had ever seen a face in the moon; it was up in the moon before it could speak distinctly.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
6  His skin was so unwholesomely deficient in the natural tinge, that he looked as though, if he were cut, he would bleed white.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
7  And he had it in charge from high authority to bring about the great public-office Millennium, when Commissioners should reign upon earth.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
8  In such terms Mr. Gradgrind always mentally introduced himself, whether to his private circle of acquaintance, or to the public in general.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
9  To continue in fistic phraseology, he had a genius for coming up to the scratch, wherever and whatever it was, and proving himself an ugly customer.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
10  He and some one hundred and forty other schoolmasters, had been lately turned at the same time, in the same factory, on the same principles, like so many pianoforte legs.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
11  He went to work in this preparatory lesson, not unlike Morgiana in the Forty Thieves: looking into all the vessels ranged before him, one after another, to see what they contained.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
12  With a rule and a pair of scales, and the multiplication table always in his pocket, sir, ready to weigh and measure any parcel of human nature, and tell you exactly what it comes to.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
13  He had virtually retired from the wholesale hardware trade before he built Stone Lodge, and was now looking about for a suitable opportunity of making an arithmetical figure in Parliament.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
14  The square finger, moving here and there, lighted suddenly on Bitzer, perhaps because he chanced to sit in the same ray of sunlight which, darting in at one of the bare windows of the intensely white-washed room, irradiated Sissy.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
15  The speaker, and the schoolmaster, and the third grown person present, all backed a little, and swept with their eyes the inclined plane of little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I
16  For, the boys and girls sat on the face of the inclined plane in two compact bodies, divided up the centre by a narrow interval; and Sissy, being at the corner of a row on the sunny side, came in for the beginning of a sunbeam, of which Bitzer, being at the corner of a row on the other side, a few rows in advance, caught the end.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
17  No little Gradgrind had ever associated a cow in a field with that famous cow with the crumpled horn who tossed the dog who worried the cat who killed the rat who ate the malt, or with that yet more famous cow who swallowed Tom Thumb: it had never heard of those celebrities, and had only been introduced to a cow as a graminivorous ruminating quadruped with several stomachs.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
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