INSUFFICIENT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - insufficient in Pride and Prejudice
1  Four sides of paper were insufficient to contain all her delight, and all her earnest desire of being loved by her sister.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
2  He had some intention, he added, of studying law, and I must be aware that the interest of one thousand pounds would be a very insufficient support therein.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
3  Words were insufficient for the elevation of his feelings; and he was obliged to walk about the room, while Elizabeth tried to unite civility and truth in a few short sentences.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
4  If I have wounded your sister's feelings, it was unknowingly done and though the motives which governed me may to you very naturally appear insufficient, I have not yet learnt to condemn them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
5  Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour, reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
6  Had his first appearance, or his resemblance to the picture they had just been examining, been insufficient to assure the other two that they now saw Mr. Darcy, the gardener's expression of surprise, on beholding his master, must immediately have told it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
7  It had always been evident to her that such an income as theirs, under the direction of two persons so extravagant in their wants, and heedless of the future, must be very insufficient to their support; and whenever they changed their quarters, either Jane or herself were sure of being applied to for some little assistance towards discharging their bills.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61