INTELLIGENCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - intelligence in Les Misérables
1  that it was the turn of intelligence to have the word.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
2  He felt that to fortify his intelligence was to fortify his hate.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII—THE INTERIOR OF DESPAIR
3  Thought is the toil of the intelligence, revery its voluptuousness.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE LARK'S MEADOW
4  Scepticism, that caries of the intelligence, had not left him a single whole idea.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—A GROUP WHICH BARELY MISSED BECOMING HISTORIC
5  It is particularly in the matter of distress and intelligence that it is dangerous to have extremes meet.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V—FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY ...
6  Mademoiselle Vaubois, perfect in her style, was the ermine of stupidity without a single spot of intelligence.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII—TWO DO NOT MAKE A PAIR
7  They opposed, and sometimes with rare intelligence, conservative liberalism to the liberalism which demolishes.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III—REQUIESCANT
8  That costs them a sou, and their good sense, and their intelligence, and their heart and their soul, and their wits.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER VI—THE SUBSTITUTE
9  Otherwise, it would be superior to intelligence, and the beast would be found to be provided with a better light than man.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER V—VAGUE FLASHES ON THE HORIZON
10  The same promiscuousness, and yet more unprecedented, exists between the things of the intelligence and the facts of substance.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III—FOLIIS AC FRONDIBUS
11  When intelligence re-awakened and beheld that action of the brute, Jean Valjean recoiled with anguish and uttered a cry of terror.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII—LITTLE GERVAIS
12  Before going to the galleys, I was a poor peasant, with very little intelligence, a sort of idiot; the galleys wrought a change in me.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER XI—CHAMPMATHIEU MORE AND MORE ASTONISHED
13  Athwart the unhealthy perceptions of an incomplete nature and a crushed intelligence, he was confusedly conscious that some monstrous thing was resting on him.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII—THE INTERIOR OF DESPAIR
14  We may be stopped; the fact may be put to us in general terms, which is one way of attenuating it; we may be told, that all trades, professions, it may be added, all the accidents of the social hierarchy and all forms of intelligence, have their own slang.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER I—ORIGIN
15  Let us say it simply, it was not he who stole; it was not the man; it was the beast, who, by habit and instinct, had simply placed his foot upon that money, while the intelligence was struggling amid so many novel and hitherto unheard-of thoughts besetting it.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII—LITTLE GERVAIS
16  The frightful leveller from below, shame, had passed over these brows; at that degree of abasement, the last transformations were suffered by all in their extremest depths, and ignorance, converted into dulness, was the equal of intelligence converted into despair.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII—THE CHAIN-GANG
17  This man was evidently very far from having those delicate habits of intelligence and spirit which render one sensible to the mysterious aspects of things; nevertheless, there was something in that sky, in that hill, in that plain, in that tree, which was so profoundly desolate, that after a moment of immobility and revery he turned back abruptly.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE EVENING OF A DAY OF WALKING
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