INTELLIGENCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - intelligence in Moby Dick
1  And that is the reason why a young buck with an intelligent looking calf's head before him, is somehow one of the saddest sights you can see.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 65. The Whale as a Dish.
2  I would have you investigate it now with the sole view of forming to yourself some unexaggerated, intelligent estimate of whatever battering-ram power may be lodged there.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 76. The Battering-Ram.
3  But while now upon so wide a field thus variously accomplished and with such liveliness of expertness in him, too; all this would seem to argue some uncommon vivacity of intelligence.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 107. The Carpenter.
4  And in return for that courtesy, the outward-bound ship would receive the latest whaling intelligence from the cruising-ground to which she may be destined, a thing of the utmost importance to her.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 53. The Gam.
5  Lying in strange folds, courses, and convolutions, to their apprehensions, it seems more in keeping with the idea of his general might to regard that mystic part of him as the seat of his intelligence.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 80. The Nut.
6  But as if perceiving this stratagem, Moby Dick, with that malicious intelligence ascribed to him, sidelingly transplanted himself, as it were, in an instant, shooting his pleated head lengthwise beneath the boat.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 133. The Chase—First Day.
7  In an extensive herd, so remarkable, occasionally, are these mystic gestures, that I have heard hunters who have declared them akin to Free-Mason signs and symbols; that the whale, indeed, by these methods intelligently conversed with the world.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 86. The Tail.
8  Nor was it his unwonted magnitude, nor his remarkable hue, nor yet his deformed lower jaw, that so much invested the whale with natural terror, as that unexampled, intelligent malignity which, according to specific accounts, he had over and over again evinced in his assaults.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
9  I do not wish to seem inelegant, but this unsightly whale looks much like an amputated sow; and, as for the narwhale, one glimpse at it is enough to amaze one, that in this nineteenth century such a hippogriff could be palmed for genuine upon any intelligent public of schoolboys.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 55. Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales.
10  Greedily sucking in this intelligence, Gabriel solemnly warned the captain against attacking the White Whale, in case the monster should be seen; in his gibbering insanity, pronouncing the White Whale to be no less a being than the Shaker God incarnated; the Shakers receiving the Bible.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 71. The Jeroboam's Story.
11  But he who in the rightly regal and intelligent spirit presides over his own private dinner-table of invited guests, that man's unchallenged power and dominion of individual influence for the time; that man's royalty of state transcends Belshazzar's, for Belshazzar was not the greatest.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. The Cabin-Table.
12  Uncommonly conscientious for a seaman, and endued with a deep natural reverence, the wild watery loneliness of his life did therefore strongly incline him to superstition; but to that sort of superstition, which in some organizations seems rather to spring, somehow, from intelligence than from ignorance.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.