INTENTION in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - intention in Wuthering Heights
1  With this intention, I turned and opened the panels.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  Catherine was too intent on his fingers to notice his face.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
3  My master glanced towards the passage, and signed me to fetch the men: he had no intention of hazarding a personal encounter.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
4  I imagined, for a moment, that this piece of eloquence was addressed to me; and, sufficiently enraged, stepped towards the aged rascal with an intention of kicking him out of the door.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
5  I repented having tried this second entrance, and was almost inclined to slip away before he finished cursing, but ere I could execute that intention, he ordered me in, and shut and re-fastened the door.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
6  He surveyed the carved front and low-browed lattices, the straggling gooseberry-bushes and crooked firs, with solemn intentness, and then shook his head: his private feelings entirely disapproved of the exterior of his new abode.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
7  I was surprised to witness how coolly the child gathered himself up, and went on with his intention; exchanging saddles and all, and then sitting down on a bundle of hay to overcome the qualm which the violent blow occasioned, before he entered the house.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
8  Indeed, he would have carpeted and papered a small spare room for a parlour; but his wife expressed such pleasure at the white floor and huge glowing fireplace, at the pewter dishes and delf-case, and dog-kennel, and the wide space there was to move about in where they usually sat, that he thought it unnecessary to her comfort, and so dropped the intention.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI