INTERESTS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - interests in Hard Times
1  There was a look of interest for him again.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  I remember that Miss Gradgrind takes no interest in the game.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
3  Her colour brightened, and she turned to him with a look of interest.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
4  Bounderby, this is a case for rigid training, and I shall observe it with interest.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  Confiding in you at all, on the faith of the interest you profess for him, I will not do so by halves.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  With this impression of her interesting character upon her, Mrs. Sparsit considered herself, in some sort, the Bank Fairy.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
7  Her brother glanced at her face with greater interest than usual, and, encircling her waist with his arm, drew her coaxingly to him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
8  With a gentleness that was as natural to him as he knew it to be to Rachael, he pursued the subject that interested her in her old age.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
9  Here Tom came lounging in, and stared at the two with a coolness not particularly savouring of interest in anything but himself, and not much of that at present.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
10  If I have acquired an interest in hearing of your instructive experiences, and can scarcely hear enough of them, I claim no merit for that, since I believe it is a general sentiment.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
11  That was not particularly well; for he remained in the greatest perplexity, and, as the hours went on, and no kind of explanation offered itself, his perplexity augmented at compound interest.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
12  The old woman was so decent and contented, and made so light of her infirmities, though they had increased upon her since her former interview with Stephen, that they both took an interest in her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
13  With a large allowance for difference of tastes, and with all submission to the patricians of Coketown, this seemed so extraordinary a source of interest to take so much trouble about, that it perplexed him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
14  Mr. Gradgrind joined them before they had gone very far, and spoke with much interest of Stephen Blackpool; for whom he thought this signal failure of the suspicions against Mrs. Pegler was likely to work well.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
15  If, in remembrance of the pains bestowed upon you there, you can persuade yourself in any degree to disregard your present interest and release my son, I entreat and pray you to give him the benefit of that remembrance.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
16  Mr. Bounderby, who had been in danger of bursting in silence, interposed here with a project for postponing the family dinner till half-past six, and taking Mr. James Harthouse in the meantime on a round of visits to the voting and interesting notabilities of Coketown and its vicinity.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
17  Mrs. Sparsit saw James Harthouse come and go; she heard of him here and there; she saw the changes of the face he had studied; she, too, remarked to a nicety how and when it clouded, how and when it cleared; she kept her black eyes wide open, with no touch of pity, with no touch of compunction, all absorbed in interest.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
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