INVADER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - invader in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  Accordingly, they assembled an army and invaded the territories of Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXV.
2  They likewise instance Agathocles, who, being unequal to support a war at home, invaded the Carthaginians, by whom he was being attacked, and reduced them to sue for peace.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
3  Again, the soldiers of an invader, finding themselves in a foreign land, are under a stronger necessity to fight, and necessity, as has often been said, is the parent of valour.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
4  of France resolved on invading Italy in order to recover the province of Lombardy, those hostile to his attempt looked mainly to the Swiss, who it was hoped would stop him in passing through their mountains.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIII.
5  Of which we have example in the Carthaginians, who, while their country was free from invasion, were able by means of their great revenues to carry on war in Italy against the Romans, but when they were invaded could not defend themselves even against Agathocles.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
6  Least of all can he decline battle who invades with his army the country of another; for seeking to enter his enemy's country, he must fight whenever the enemy comes forward to meet him; and is under still greater necessity to fight, if he undertake the siege of any town.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
7  Every one knows, how, only the other day, the King of England invaded the realm of France with an army raised wholly from among his own people, although from his country having been at peace for thirty years, he had neither men nor officers who had ever looked an enemy in the face.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXI.
8  For Philip being invaded by the Romans, resolved not to give them battle; and to avoid battle, sought at first to do as Fabius had done in Italy, posting himself on the summit of a hill, where he intrenched himself strongly, thinking that the Romans would not venture to attack him there.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
9  When those thus driven forth are in large numbers, they violently invade the territories of other nations, slaughtering the inhabitants, seizing on their possessions, founding new kingdoms, and giving new names to provinces; as was done by Moses, and by those tribes who overran the Roman Empire.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII.
10  For a prince or commonwealth, when attacking another State, will be content to rid themselves of those only who are at the head of affairs; but an entire people, set in motion in the manner described, must destroy all who oppose them, since their object is to subsist on that whereon those whom they invade have hitherto subsisted.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII.
11  For the nearer an enemy approached Rome, the more completely he found her armed for resistance; and accordingly we see that on the occasion of Hannibal's invasion of Italy, the Romans, after three defeats, and after the slaughter of so many of their captains and soldiers, were still able, not merely to withstand the invader, but even, in the end, to come off victorious.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXX.
12  Philip of Macedon, the father of Perseus, a great soldier in his day, and of a great name, on being invaded by the Romans, laid waste and relinquished much of his territory which he thought he could not defend; rightly judging it more hurtful to his reputation to lose territory after an attempt to defend it, than to abandon it to the enemy as something he cared little to retain.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XXXVII.