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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - iron in Moby Dick
1  A short rushing sound leaped out of the boat; it was the darted iron of Queequeg.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
2  They had made a harpooneer of him, and that barbed iron was in lieu of a sceptre now.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. Biographical.
3  Squall, whale, and harpoon had all blended together; and the whale, merely grazed by the iron, escaped.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
4  The air around suddenly vibrated and tingled, as it were, like the air over intensely heated plates of iron.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
5  Go and gaze upon the iron emblematical harpoons round yonder lofty mansion, and your question will be answered.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. The Street.
6  That bravely and uninjured takes the jam which would have snapped all their oaken handspikes and iron crow-bars.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 76. The Battering-Ram.
7  The three men were then cut down, all hands were turned to, and, sullenly worked by the moody seamen, the iron pumps clanged as before.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
8  With them he pushed off; and, after much weary pulling, and many perilous, unsuccessful onsets, he at last succeeded in getting one iron fast.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 71. The Jeroboam's Story.
9  Silently obeying the order, the three harpooneers now stood with the detached iron part of their harpoons, some three feet long, held, barbs up, before him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
10  The original iron entered nigh the tail, and, like a restless needle sojourning in the body of a man, travelled full forty feet, and at last was found imbedded in the hump.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
11  At the period of our arrival at the Island, the heaviest storage of the Pequod had been almost completed; comprising her beef, bread, water, fuel, and iron hoops and staves.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20. All Astir.
12  Now it needs a strong, nervous arm to strike the first iron into the fish; for often, in what is called a long dart, the heavy implement has to be flung to the distance of twenty or thirty feet.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 62. The Dart.
13  Gnawed within and scorched without, with the infixed, unrelenting fangs of some incurable idea; such an one, could he be found, would seem the very man to dart his iron and lift his lance against the most appalling of all brutes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
14  Of modern standers-of-mast-heads we have but a lifeless set; mere stone, iron, and bronze men; who, though well capable of facing out a stiff gale, are still entirely incompetent to the business of singing out upon discovering any strange sight.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
15  But it very often happens that owing to the instantaneous, violent, convulsive running of the whale upon receiving the first iron, it becomes impossible for the harpooneer, however lightning-like in his movements, to pitch the second iron into him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 63. The Crotch.
16  Nevertheless, as the second iron is already connected with the line, and the line is running, hence that weapon must, at all events, be anticipatingly tossed out of the boat, somehow and somewhere; else the most terrible jeopardy would involve all hands.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 63. The Crotch.
17  Furthermore: you must know that when the second iron is thrown overboard, it thenceforth becomes a dangling, sharp-edged terror, skittishly curvetting about both boat and whale, entangling the lines, or cutting them, and making a prodigious sensation in all directions.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 63. The Crotch.
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