JET in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - jet in Moby Dick
1  Fedallah first descried this jet.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
2  And still, at wide intervals in the silvery night, the lonely, alluring jet would be seen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 59. Squid.
3  Nothing seemed before me but a jet gloom, now and then made ghastly by flashes of redness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 96. The Try-Works.
4  It is well known that the elephant will often draw up water or dust in his trunk, and then elevating it, jet it forth in a stream.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 86. The Tail.
5  Another thing; I have heard it said, and I do not much doubt it, that if the jet is fairly spouted into your eyes, it will blind you.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 85. The Fountain.
6  But though the ship so swiftly sped, and though from every eye, like arrows, the eager glances shot, yet the silvery jet was no more seen that night.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
7  The whale was now going head out, and sending his spout before him in a continual tormented jet; while his one poor fin beat his side in an agony of fright.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 81. The Pequod Meets The Virgin.
8  But calm, snow-white, and unvarying; still directing its fountain of feathers to the sky; still beckoning us on from before, the solitary jet would at times be descried.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
9  But lazily undulating in the trough of the sea, and ever and anon tranquilly spouting his vapoury jet, the whale looked like a portly burgher smoking his pipe of a warm afternoon.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. Stubb Kills a Whale.
10  But though the green palmy cliffs of the land soon loomed on the starboard bow, and with delighted nostrils the fresh cinnamon was snuffed in the air, yet not a single jet was descried.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
11  For even when coming into slight contact with the outer, vapoury shreds of the jet, which will often happen, your skin will feverishly smart, from the acridness of the thing so touching it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 85. The Fountain.
12  Chief among these latter was a great Sperm Whale, which, after an unusually long raging gale, had been found dead and stranded, with his head against a cocoa-nut tree, whose plumage-like, tufted droopings seemed his verdant jet.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 102. A Bower in the Arsacides.
13  Mysteriously jetted into the clear moonlight, or starlight, as the case might be; disappearing again for one whole day, or two days, or three; and somehow seeming at every distinct repetition to be advancing still further and further in our van, this solitary jet seemed for ever alluring us on.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
14  At the instant of the dart an ulcerous jet shot from this cruel wound, and goaded by it into more than sufferable anguish, the whale now spouting thick blood, with swift fury blindly darted at the craft, bespattering them and their glorying crews all over with showers of gore, capsizing Flask's boat and marring the bows.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 81. The Pequod Meets The Virgin.
15  It was while gliding through these latter waters that one serene and moonlight night, when all the waves rolled by like scrolls of silver; and, by their soft, suffusing seethings, made what seemed a silvery silence, not a solitude; on such a silent night a silvery jet was seen far in advance of the white bubbles at the bow.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
16  But when, after spending his uniform interval there for several successive nights without uttering a single sound; when, after all this silence, his unearthly voice was heard announcing that silvery, moon-lit jet, every reclining mariner started to his feet as if some winged spirit had lighted in the rigging, and hailed the mortal crew.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
17  Very shy; always going solitary; unexpectedly rising to the surface in the remotest and most sullen waters; his straight and single lofty jet rising like a tall misanthropic spear upon a barren plain; gifted with such wondrous power and velocity in swimming, as to defy all present pursuit from man; this leviathan seems the banished and unconquerable Cain of his race, bearing for his mark that style upon his back.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
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