JEWELS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - jewels in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  He discovered wonderful stories, also, about jewels.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
2  Its supports were of silver gilt, beautifully chased, and profusely set with enamelled and jewelled medallions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
3  Henry II wore jewelled gloves reaching to the elbow, and had a hawk-glove sewn with twelve rubies and fifty-two great orients.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
4  He escorted them to their box with a sort of pompous humility, waving his fat jewelled hands and talking at the top of his voice.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  On one occasion he took up the study of jewels, and appeared at a costume ball as Anne de Joyeuse, Admiral of France, in a dress covered with five hundred and sixty pearls.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
6  The Renaissance knew of strange manners of poisoning--poisoning by a helmet and a lighted torch, by an embroidered glove and a jewelled fan, by a gilded pomander and by an amber chain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
7  She wore a moss-coloured velvet jerkin with cinnamon sleeves, slim, brown, cross-gartered hose, a dainty little green cap with a hawk's feather caught in a jewel, and a hooded cloak lined with dull red.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
8  The style in which it was written was that curious jewelled style, vivid and obscure at once, full of argot and of archaisms, of technical expressions and of elaborate paraphrases, that characterizes the work of some of the finest artists of the French school of Symbolistes.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
9  In the long cedar chests that lined the west gallery of his house, he had stored away many rare and beautiful specimens of what is really the raiment of the Bride of Christ, who must wear purple and jewels and fine linen that she may hide the pallid macerated body that is worn by the suffering that she seeks for and wounded by self-inflicted pain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11