JUSTICE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - justice in The Merchant of Venice
1  He hath refus'd it in the open court, He shall have merely justice and his bond.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
2  For, as thou urgest justice, be assur'd Thou shalt have justice more than thou desir'st.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
3  He plies the Duke at morning and at night, And doth impeach the freedom of the state If they deny him justice.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
4  Thou call'dst me dog before thou hadst a cause, But since I am a dog, beware my fangs; The Duke shall grant me justice.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
5  Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
6  I have spoke thus much To mitigate the justice of thy plea, Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.'
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
7  Twenty merchants, The Duke himself, and the magnificoes Of greatest port have all persuaded with him, But none can drive him from the envious plea Of forfeiture, of justice, and his bond.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
8  The Duke cannot deny the course of law, For the commodity that strangers have With us in Venice, if it be denied, 'Twill much impeach the justice of the state, Since that the trade and profit of the city Consisteth of all nations.'
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
9  His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV