JUSTICE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - justice in Pride and Prejudice
1  Perhaps I am not doing her justice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
2  I cannot do justice to his kindness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
3  Neither could she deny the justice of his description of Jane.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
4  Mrs. Gardiner and her niece, however, did her justice, and pitied her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
5  Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 60
6  I know you will do him such ample justice, that I am growing every moment more unconcerned and indifferent.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 40
7  You have only proved by this," cried Elizabeth, "that Mr. Bingley did not do justice to his own disposition.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
8  She felt anew the justice of Mr. Darcy's objections; and never had she been so much disposed to pardon his interference in the views of his friend.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
9  You must, therefore, pardon the freedom with which I demand your attention; your feelings, I know, will bestow it unwillingly, but I demand it of your justice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
10  His belief of her sister's insensibility she instantly resolved to be false; and his account of the real, the worst objections to the match, made her too angry to have any wish of doing him justice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
11  The justice of the charge struck her too forcibly for denial, and the circumstances to which he particularly alluded as having passed at the Netherfield ball, and as confirming all his first disapprobation, could not have made a stronger impression on his mind than on hers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36