KEEP in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - keep in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  No, you must keep your good looks.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  He won't like you the better for keeping your promises.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  "Quite ready, James," she answered, keeping her eyes on her work.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
4  "It would not interest you, Mr. Hubbard," he said, keeping his eye on the man.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
5  I keep a diary of my life from day to day, and it never leaves the room in which it is written.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
6  "You might keep some of your kisses for me, Sibyl, I think," said the lad with a good-natured grumble.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
7  But we are not likely to suffer from it unless these fellows keep chattering about this thing at dinner.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
8  When the blood crept from its face, and left behind a pallid mask of chalk with leaden eyes, he would keep the glamour of boyhood.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
9  "I am told, on excellent authority, that her father keeps an American dry-goods store," said Sir Thomas Burdon, looking supercilious.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
10  In the wild struggle for existence, we want to have something that endures, and so we fill our minds with rubbish and facts, in the silly hope of keeping our place.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  A bishop keeps on saying at the age of eighty what he was told to say when he was a boy of eighteen, and as a natural consequence he always looks absolutely delightful.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  "I am afraid it is rather heavy," murmured Dorian as he unlocked the door that opened into the room that was to keep for him the curious secret of his life and hide his soul from the eyes of men.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
13  I only knew that I had seen perfection face to face, and that the world had become wonderful to my eyes--too wonderful, perhaps, for in such mad worships there is peril, the peril of losing them, no less than the peril of keeping them.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
14  It was a large, well-proportioned room, which had been specially built by the last Lord Kelso for the use of the little grandson whom, for his strange likeness to his mother, and also for other reasons, he had always hated and desired to keep at a distance.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
15  It was true that as one watched life in its curious crucible of pain and pleasure, one could not wear over one's face a mask of glass, nor keep the sulphurous fumes from troubling the brain and making the imagination turbid with monstrous fancies and misshapen dreams.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
16  He had uttered a mad wish that he himself might remain young, and the portrait grow old; that his own beauty might be untarnished, and the face on the canvas bear the burden of his passions and his sins; that the painted image might be seared with the lines of suffering and thought, and that he might keep all the delicate bloom and loveliness of his then just conscious boyhood.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7