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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - know in Moby Dick
1  I know little more of him, nor does anybody else.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
2  Well, well; I don't know what it is, but the Lord keep me from catching it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29. Enter Ahab; to Him, Stubb.
3  I don't know how it is, but people like to be private when they are sleeping.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
4  But savages are strange beings; at times you do not know exactly how to take them.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
5  How it is I know not; but there is no place like a bed for confidential disclosures between friends.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
6  I don't know exactly what's the matter with him; but he keeps close inside the house; a sort of sick, and yet he don't look so.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
7  And somehow, at the time, I felt a sympathy and a sorrow for him, but for I don't know what, unless it was the cruel loss of his leg.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
8  And yet I also felt a strange awe of him; but that sort of awe, which I cannot at all describe, was not exactly awe; I do not know what it was.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
9  I don't know anything about Deacon Deuteronomy or his meeting," said I; "all I know is, that Queequeg here is a born member of the First Congregational Church.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. His Mark.
10  My friend," said I, "what all this gibberish of yours is about, I don't know, and I don't much care; for it seems to me that you must be a little damaged in the head.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. The Prophet.
11  But as I was going to say, if thou wantest to know what whaling is, as thou tellest ye do, I can put ye in a way of finding it out before ye bind yourself to it, past backing out.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
12  Afterwards I wondered the less at this operation when I came to know of what fine steel the head of a harpoon is made, and how exceedingly sharp the long straight edges are always kept.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
13  DEVIL-DAM, I do not know the origin of; TIT-BIT is obvious; PEQUOD, you will no doubt remember, was the name of a celebrated tribe of Massachusetts Indians; now extinct as the ancient Medes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
14  Whether it was that this undulating tester rolled the savage away to far distant scenes, I know not, but he now spoke of his native island; and, eager to hear his history, I begged him to go on and tell it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. Nightgown.
15  Aye, aye, I know that he was never very jolly; and I know that on the passage home, he was a little out of his mind for a spell; but it was the sharp shooting pains in his bleeding stump that brought that about, as any one might see.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
16  And I did not know but what the stingy old Bildad might have a mighty deal to say about shipping hands, especially as I now found him on board the Pequod, quite at home there in the cabin, and reading his Bible as if at his own fireside.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
17  How now in the contemplative evening of his days, the pious Bildad reconciled these things in the reminiscence, I do not know; but it did not seem to concern him much, and very probably he had long since come to the sage and sensible conclusion that a man's religion is one thing, and this practical world quite another.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
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