LEARN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - learn in Sense and Sensibility
1  Had he ever been in the way of learning, I think he would have drawn very well.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
2  They were to meet Mrs. Ferrars; but Elinor could not learn whether her sons were to be of the party.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
3  In short, I could learn nothing but that she was gone; all the rest, for eight long months, was left to conjecture.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
4  But, as it was, she only learned, from some very significant looks, how far their penetration, founded on Margaret's instructions, extended.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
5  From such commendation as this, however, there was not much to be learned; Elinor well knew that the sweetest girls in the world were to be met with in every part of England, under every possible variation of form, face, temper and understanding.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
6  It would grieve me indeed to be obliged to think ill of you; but if I am to do it, if I am to learn that you are not what we have hitherto believed you, that your regard for us all was insincere, that your behaviour to me was intended only to deceive, let it be told as soon as possible.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
7  Marianne was of no use on these occasions, as she would never learn the game; but though her time was therefore at her own disposal, the evening was by no means more productive of pleasure to her than to Elinor, for it was spent in all the anxiety of expectation and the pain of disappointment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26