LEAVING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - leaving in Jane Eyre
1  He paused: the birds went on carolling, the leaves lightly rustling.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
2  Mr. Rochester took it, leaving room, however, for me: but I stood before him.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
3  When I looked up, on leaving his arms, there stood the widow, pale, grave, and amazed.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
4  I was just leaving the stile; yet, as the path was narrow, I sat still to let it go by.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
5  At intervals, while turning over the leaves of my book, I studied the aspect of that winter afternoon.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
6  Flowers peeped out amongst the leaves; snow-drops, crocuses, purple auriculas, and golden-eyed pansies.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
7  She closed the door, leaving me solus with Mr. St. John, who sat opposite, a book or newspaper in his hand.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
8  Diana and Mary Rivers became more sad and silent as the day approached for leaving their brother and their home.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
9  The second picture contained for foreground only the dim peak of a hill, with grass and some leaves slanting as if by a breeze.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
10  I did not like to walk at this hour alone with Mr. Rochester in the shadowy orchard; but I could not find a reason to allege for leaving him.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
11  Moreover, before I definitively resolve on quitting England, I will know for certain whether I cannot be of greater use by remaining in it than by leaving it.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
12  Far and wide, on each side, there were only fields, where no cattle now browsed; and the little brown birds, which stirred occasionally in the hedge, looked like single russet leaves that had forgotten to drop.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
13  I covered my head and arms with the skirt of my frock, and went out to walk in a part of the plantation which was quite sequestrated; but I found no pleasure in the silent trees, the falling fir-cones, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps, and now stiffened together.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  My father always cherished the idea that he would atone for his error by leaving his possessions to us; that letter informs us that he has bequeathed every penny to the other relation, with the exception of thirty guineas, to be divided between St. John, Diana, and Mary Rivers, for the purchase of three mourning rings.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
15  In seeking the door, I turned an angle: there shot out the friendly gleam again, from the lozenged panes of a very small latticed window, within a foot of the ground, made still smaller by the growth of ivy or some other creeping plant, whose leaves clustered thick over the portion of the house wall in which it was set.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
16  Thus engaged, he appeared, sitting in his own recess, quiet and absorbed enough; but that blue eye of his had a habit of leaving the outlandish-looking grammar, and wandering over, and sometimes fixing upon us, his fellow-students, with a curious intensity of observation: if caught, it would be instantly withdrawn; yet ever and anon, it returned searchingly to our table.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV