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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - left in Hard Times
1  Everything was left, all right.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  He resumed where he had left off.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
3  She will never believe it of him, but he has cut away and left her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
4  And the trees arched over him, whispering that he left a true and loving heart behind.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
5  When I had no more left to tell, he put his arms round my neck, and kissed me a great many times.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
6  Mr. Bounderby stayed her, by holding a mouthful of chop in suspension before swallowing it, and putting out his left hand.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
7  Upon this, the whole appearance before him and around him changed, and nothing was left as it had been, but himself and the clergyman.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
8  By general consent, they even avoided that side of the street on which he habitually walked; and left it, of all the working men, to him only.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
9  If there is any Ology left, of any description, that has not been worn to rags in this house, all I can say is, I hope I shall never hear its name.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
10  Looking at no one, and going his way with a lowly steadiness upon him that asserted nothing and sought nothing, Old Stephen, with all his troubles on his head, left the scene.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
11  When they turned into a narrow street, Stephen glanced at his window with a dread that always haunted his desolate home; but it was open, as he had left it, and no one was there.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
12  One might have fancied he had talked it off; and that what was left, all standing up in disorder, was in that condition from being constantly blown about by his windy boastfulness.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
13  The simple circumstance of being left alone with her husband and Mr. Bounderby, was sufficient to stun this admirable lady again without collision between herself and any other fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
14  It was very strange that a young gentleman who had never been left to his own guidance for five consecutive minutes, should be incapable at last of governing himself; but so it was with Tom.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
15  The orator having refreshed himself, wiped his corrugated forehead from left to right several times with his handkerchief folded into a pad, and concentrated all his revived forces, in a sneer of great disdain and bitterness.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
16  The member of the fluffy classes was injured, exasperated, left the house grumbling, met somebody who proposed to him to go in for some share in this Bank business, went in, put something in his pocket which had nothing in it before, and relieved his mind extremely.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
17  All the journey, immovable in the air though never left behind; plain to the dark eyes of her mind, as the electric wires which ruled a colossal strip of music-paper out of the evening sky, were plain to the dark eyes of her body; Mrs. Sparsit saw her staircase, with the figure coming down.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
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