LIFE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - life in Moby Dick
1  I turned in, and never slept better in my life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
2  Far above all other hunted whales, his is an unwritten life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
3  It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
4  I went up in it to a bit of glass stuck against the wall, and I never saw such a sight in my life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  He looked neither one way nor the other way, but sat like a carved image with scarce a sign of active life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
6  He had been a sailor and a harpooneer in his youth, but for many years past had dedicated his life to the ministry.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
7  He did; and then it seemed to me that he was dogging us, but with what intent I could not for the life of me imagine.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. The Prophet.
8  Old age is always wakeful; as if, the longer linked with life, the less man has to do with aught that looks like death.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29. Enter Ahab; to Him, Stubb.
9  A staid, steadfast man, whose life for the most part was a telling pantomime of action, and not a tame chapter of sounds.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
10  Looking into his eyes, you seemed to see there the yet lingering images of those thousand-fold perils he had calmly confronted through life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
11  But, doubtless, this noble savage fed strong and drank deep of the abounding element of air; and through his dilated nostrils snuffed in the sublime life of the worlds.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. The Cabin-Table.
12  There is no life in thee, now, except that rocking life imparted by a gently rolling ship; by her, borrowed from the sea; by the sea, from the inscrutable tides of God.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
13  It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
14  And what with the standing spectacle of the black terrific Ahab, and the periodical tumultuous visitations of these three savages, Dough-Boy's whole life was one continual lip-quiver.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. The Cabin-Table.
15  For again Starbuck's downcast eyes lighted up with the stubbornness of life; the subterranean laugh died away; the winds blew on; the sails filled out; the ship heaved and rolled as before.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
16  No one having previously heard his history, could for the first time behold Father Mapple without the utmost interest, because there were certain engrafted clerical peculiarities about him, imputable to that adventurous maritime life he had led.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
17  I freely assert, that the cosmopolite philosopher cannot, for his life, point out one single peaceful influence, which within the last sixty years has operated more potentially upon the whole broad world, taken in one aggregate, than the high and mighty business of whaling.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24. The Advocate.
18  Uncommonly conscientious for a seaman, and endued with a deep natural reverence, the wild watery loneliness of his life did therefore strongly incline him to superstition; but to that sort of superstition, which in some organizations seems rather to spring, somehow, from intelligence than from ignorance.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
19  What, perhaps, with other things, made Stubb such an easy-going, unfearing man, so cheerily trudging off with the burden of life in a world full of grave pedlars, all bowed to the ground with their packs; what helped to bring about that almost impious good-humor of his; that thing must have been his pipe.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. Knights and Squires.
20  Rising from a little cabin-boy in short clothes of the drabbest drab, to a harpooneer in a broad shad-bellied waistcoat; from that becoming boat-header, chief-mate, and captain, and finally a ship owner; Bildad, as I hinted before, had concluded his adventurous career by wholly retiring from active life at the goodly age of sixty, and dedicating his remaining days to the quiet receiving of his well-earned income.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.