LONELY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - lonely in Jane Eyre
1  Diana and Mary have left you, and Moor House is shut up, and you are so lonely.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
2  Cooler and fresher at the moment the gale seemed to visit my brow: I could have deemed that in some wild, lone scene, I and Jane were meeting.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
3  As yet I had spoken to no one, nor did anybody seem to take notice of me; I stood lonely enough: but to that feeling of isolation I was accustomed; it did not oppress me much.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
5  The ground was hard, the air was still, my road was lonely; I walked fast till I got warm, and then I walked slowly to enjoy and analyse the species of pleasure brooding for me in the hour and situation.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
6  At the bottom was a sunk fence; its sole separation from lonely fields: a winding walk, bordered with laurels and terminating in a giant horse-chestnut, circled at the base by a seat, led down to the fence.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
7  I was yet enjoying the calm prospect and pleasant fresh air, yet listening with delight to the cawing of the rooks, yet surveying the wide, hoary front of the hall, and thinking what a great place it was for one lonely little dame like Mrs. Fairfax to inhabit, when that lady appeared at the door.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
8  Farther off were hills: not so lofty as those round Lowood, nor so craggy, nor so like barriers of separation from the living world; but yet quiet and lonely hills enough, and seeming to embrace Thornfield with a seclusion I had not expected to find existent so near the stirring locality of Millcote.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
9  One evening, in the beginning of June, I had stayed out very late with Mary Ann in the wood; we had, as usual, separated ourselves from the others, and had wandered far; so far that we lost our way, and had to ask it at a lonely cottage, where a man and woman lived, who looked after a herd of half-wild swine that fed on the mast in the wood.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX